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Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

My Dream

Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Letter Judith Van Swaringen to MLK

Tuesday, December 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Judith Van Swaringen, a senior at Surrattaville High School in Clinton, Maryland, writes to Dr. King requesting information for her report dealing with the Reverend's steps leading to the Nobel Peace Prize.

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Friday, August 4, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI), San Francisco, CA, Berkeley, CA, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Cambridge, MA, Wisconsin (WI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Berkeley, CA

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Why Pay for Segregation?

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

In this appeal to the public, the author personifies segregation and urges Negroes to stop spending money at any store that practices segregation until segregation is dead and buried.

Request for Land Reform Bill

An anonymous writer asks Dr. King to petition Congress for a reform bill that would allow all people, irrespective of race, creed or societal status, to own land.

Man

Dr. King interprets Jeremiah 51:17 to mean that man compared to God is stupid and man's knowledge compared to God's infinite knowledge is nothing.

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Mays presents Dr. King with a $300 honorarium for giving the first convocation address at Morehouse College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Indiana (IN), SOUTH AFRICA, South Carolina (SC), VIETNAM, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Gothamettes, Inc. writes Dr. King sending a contribution of $150. In closing, Boozer requests a receipt or prompt acknowledgement of the contribution.

Telegram from Jeffrey Archer to MLK

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Jeffery Archer of Brasenose College requests a signed copy of one of Dr. King's books for the Oxfam Campaign.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS)

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

MLK Statement on Church Groundbreaking

Monday, February 4, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on the burning of churches in Dawson, Georgia, stating that this act is a symbol of the "tragic depth to which men and women can sink when they are guided by prejudice and when they are filled with hatred."

Letter from Vilna Torres to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vilna Torres writes a letter of condolence to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Chicago Freedom Rally

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Ohio (OH)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961
Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Boston, MA

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.