Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Denver, CO"

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Memo from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Friday, June 17, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Gloria Fraction states Dr. Dorothy Sutton Branch spoke with Dr. King about meeting a group in Lawndale. She also inquires of Andrew Young when Dr. King would be available for an interview with a reporter.

Rejection Letter from MLK to Areatha G. Bailey Regarding the Freedom Fund Dinner

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Dr. King informs Areatha G. Bailey that he will not be able to attend the Freedom Fund Dinner.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Hartford, CT

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King notes that Kierkegaard reversed the Hegelian dialectic.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Judith Van Swaringen

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dorothy Gaines, assistant to Dr. King, responds to a letter from Judith Van Swaringen suggesting that she read the enclosed biographical sketch.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

God

Dr. King notes that Samuel Alexander does not see God as creator but creature.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK to Ozie Vincent at Chicago's WBEE

Chicago, IL

Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Vincent for not being able to tape five messages for his program in the month of December.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

New York, NY

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964
JAPAN

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.

Rural Negros Start New Program

Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL

This press release from the SCLC informs the public that the self-help program of education for seasonal farm workers in Wilcox County, Alabama has officially opened. Along with the help of the federal office of Economic Opportunity, the SCLC wishes to create hope for neglected rural families. Also, to make this program a success, the antipoverty agency funded about $250 as well as a federal grant of $300 to help in financing this project.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

VIETNAM

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Long Island Baptist Societies Memorial Resolution on MLK

New York (NY)

In this memorial resolution, the Board of Trustees of the Long Island Baptist Societies expresses its deep sense of loss at the tragic death of Dr. King. The board acknowledges the debt that is owed to Dr. King and commits to continuing his work.

Letter from Tony Schrader to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Tony Schrader informs Dr. King that his college is sponsoring a primary on campus for Choice '68. Schrader requests "any free campaign materials or statements of policies of Dr. King."

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Washington (WA)

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."