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The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, SOUTH AFRICA, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

Chicago, IL

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys


Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.


Dr. King reflects on history as it pertains to human society.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation" on the place Christ holds in Christianity as its historical founders.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960
Atlanta, GA

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from Dick Hall to MLK

Chicago, IL

Dick Hall, Group Leader with the Chicago area Salvation Army, writes Dr. King to inform him of a program the daycare center conducts that caters to children in the surrounding area. Mr. Hill also requests Dr. King's autograph for a project display the children in the program are constructing.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Patripassianism"

Dr. King outlines "Patripassianism" .This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Project Head Start: A Pre-school Program for Children

Washington, D.C.

This letter and enclosure from Project Head Start, sponsored by the OEO, is written to an anonymous recipient describing some of the features of the program.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
New York, NY, Vermont (VT)

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King


Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Iwanabe

In this draft letter to Mr. Iwanabe, Dr. King explains his methods, understanding and goals pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK


In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Letter from R. Belui to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

R. Belui thanks Dr. King for his courage in the fight for social justice. He also expresses his wishes for Dr. King's to be a presidential candidate.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway. The trip is associated with Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, ITALY, VIETNAM

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Letter from C. Sumner Stone Jr. to Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, August 8, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

"Washington Afro-American" Editor Chuck Stone forwards Rev. Wyatt Walker the resumes of individuals that might be suitable to work as a public relations specialist for the SCLC. He urges that Walker and Dr. King carefully examine the resumes and respond to "the more outstanding candidates."

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Washington (WA), Alabama (AL), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

University of West Indies News Release

Thursday, May 27, 1965

The University of West Indies releases a statement announcing Dr. King's acceptance to preach the University's Valedictory Sermon.