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Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Nero History an Culture

This flyer features an adult course offered by Berkley Unified School District. The curriculum includes an analysis of African American history, cultural and socially contextual outlooks.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Dinkar Sakrikar, General Secretary of Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for accepting a Mahatma Gandhi memorial gift. The memorial gift includes Indian children's toys, a set of Gandhi's books, and a bronze statue of Gandhi to be installed in a children's park in the United States.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter from Emmi Kuhnlein to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mrs. Kuhnlein expresses admiration for Dr. King and shares her experiences as a member of the German Union movement. She equates the German working class living conditions as being similar to the slums in the US. She also suggests employing a tactic used by Israel of putting young people to work as a way to resolve slum conditions. A news clipping is attached to further support her suggestion.

Letter to Mrs. King from Katherine Hardy

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

Katherine Hardy, a mother of five, faces eviction and desperately writes to Mrs. King for any aid she can provide.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Repentance

Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.

Letter from Robert Zuckerman to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 24, 1963

Robert Zuckerman requests a copy of a commencement speech given by Dr. King.

Letter of Condolence from Martin and Coretta Scott King to Mrs. Lee Gaber

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. & Mrs. King express sincere condolences to Mrs. Lee Gaber and family during her time of grief.

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species."

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."