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94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethel Sebastian

Friday, September 21, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Sebastian that Dr. King will make inquiries about her father when he returns to Albany and hopes the two will reunite soon.

I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert Zuckerman to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 24, 1963

Robert Zuckerman requests a copy of a commencement speech given by Dr. King.

Letter from William H. Shell to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962

William H. Shell is preparing an address for a high school graduation and is in need of various documents surrounding Dr. King's organization. Mr. Shell desires to know the detailed goals of the Civil Rights Movement, civil rights techniques, and the education demographics for the early 1960's.

The SCLC Hall of Fame Dinner of July 1962

Friday, July 20, 1962

This pamphlet is from the Hall of Fame Dinner for Jackie Robinson. It features several ads from organizations supporting the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Barnard Holliday

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Holliday, Pastor at Pond Street Baptist Church, thanking him for his contribution and words of encouragement. Dr. King also encloses a receipt for his donation.

Power for the Powerless - SCLC's Basic Challenge

This report outlines the objectives of the SCLC, as well as programs and projects led by various departments. It also includes a staff listing and organizational chart.

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

Letter from MLK to Charles V. Arthur

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Mr. Arthur to thank the staff of Kitsilano Secondary School for their contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Letter from Kenneth Pierce to MLK

Kenneth Pierce was recently released from Fulton County jail and informs Dr. King that he would like to speak to him about an "important situation." Mr. Pierce also references another cellmate who would like to communicate to Dr. King or one of his representatives as well.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.