Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Des Moines, IA"

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King records a note on Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Letter from Ned Griffin to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963

Ned Griffin, a fourth grade student at Betsy Ross School, acknowledges Dr. King's great contribution to the United States. He explains that his fourth grade class would like an autographed picture of Dr. King for their bulletin at school.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Marian S. Dockhorn

Friday, April 24, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Marian S. Deckhorn's letter concerning the invitation extended to him and Coretta Scott King for the Bucks Count World Peace Fair. Dr. King notifies Mrs. Deckhorn that they will be unable to attend on the suggested date due to his international travel to Berlin.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin Brown

Thursday, October 14, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to Benjamin Brown of CORE on behalf of Dr. King. She tells Mr. Brown of Dr. King's travels and urges him to pick up a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" in order to find a fitting quote to publish in the "CORE Guide."

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

Letter from the TATTLER Staff to MLK

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

The TATTLER staff at Atlanta's Drexel Catholic High School congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from the European Baptist Federation to Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 7, 1964

P.M. Smith, Dr. Ruden's secretary, writes to Miss McDonald to express gratitude for Dr. King's consideration in attending the European Baptist Federation Conference in Amsterdam.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, July 23, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Oncken Verlag Publishers should not be permitted to use his "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" because of a previous publishing agreement with the Econ Verlag Publishing Company.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, February 29, 1968

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.