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Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

Letter from Ernesto R. Rodriguez, Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Ernesto Rodriguez invites Dr. King to address the College Editors Guild Alumni Association at their 35th Anniversary Celebration.

Adverse Letter to MLK

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Letter from Thelton Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. Henderson, of the University of California-Berkeley, invites Dr. King to participate in a Civil Rights Symposium. Notable persons such as Robert Kennedy and Stokley Carmichael previously appeared at the symposium.

Immortality

Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Tuesday, January 1, 1974

This document is regarding the celebration of the Birthday Anniversary of the late Dr. King. The author states, "While the national holiday legislation is pending in Congress, masses of people everywhere already personally declare the date to be their own to honor one of history's greatest leaders."

Letter from MLK Regarding Southern Christian Leadership Conference

In this letter, Dr. King appeals to the potential donors of the S.C.L.C. Dr. King also highlights a number of activities the S.C.L.C. has organized with the purpose of securing voting rights and raising funds for churches burned by segregationists.