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Letter from David Darrin to Jeannette Rankin

Sunday, January 21, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Here, in this document, David Darrin writes to the Honorable Jeannette Rankin, National Women's Party, regarding the organization of The National Council for Promoting World Peace.

Letter from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter, dated March 6, 1968, Minister Jones urgently requests photostatic copies of letters and newspaper clippings concerning "Jet Cruiser," as well as "Lost Potentials."

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK)

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
London, England

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Washington, D.C.

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

History

Dr. King provides the pessimist's perception of history.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
New York, NY, Detroit, MI

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Royalty Summary for MLK from J. Campe

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY

This royalty statement, from J.Campe, details Dr. King's sales and earnings from the French edition of "The Strength to Love", during the given time period.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Indiana (IN), Washington, D.C., Berlin, Germany, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason."

Letter from Lucy Amerson to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Lucy Amerson corresponds with Dr. King in reference to a $150 donation made by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to SCLC. The donation was a portion of the funds raised through the Ebony Fashion Fair project.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Open Letter Regarding Chicago Real Estate Practices

Monday, August 1, 1966
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Lee Brooke, of Oak Park River Forest Housing Committee near Chicago, sends an open letter to members of Congress, the Governor of Illinois and the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In it, he discusses discriminatory real estate practices in the Chicago area, and presents evidence gathered by the housing committee to show why there is a need to regulate the real estate industry.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Louisiana (LA), Tennessee (TN)

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays encourages the institution's board of trustee members to participate in the Centennial Convocation platform party. President Mays also encloses a calendar of events for the College's 100th Anniversary week.

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966
New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Letter to Margaret C. Fowler from MLK about Governor Nelson Rockefeller

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter to New York Calendar Secretary Margaret Fowler, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Governor Rockefeller's willingness to speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Men's Day Observance. Dr. King then describes the schedule of events for Rockefeller's visit.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.

SCLC Newsletter: July 1963

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This SCLC newsletter features numerous articles written by members of the SCLC regarding Birmingham, Alabama. Also featured is a graphic story of the crisis in Birmingham.

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oregon (OR)

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

MLK Responds to Robert W. Fischer on Autographed Cover of TIME Magazine

Tuesday, March 24, 1964
ITALY

Dr. King responds to Robert Fischer's request for is Autographed cover of TIME magazine. He expresses his appreciation of Fischer's support and how honored he was to receive the title of Man of the Year. Dr. King views this honor as a tribute to the entire civil rights movement and those who continuously pursue the fight for social justice.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.