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Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA, INDIA, New York (NY)

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter from Nathan W. Turner to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Wisconsin (WI)

The American Baptist Board of Education and Publication sends a contribution to the SCLC to assist with voter registration.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Lowery

Friday, November 11, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discloses possible discrepancies made by Hosea Williams. He further proposes individuals to investigate the allegations brought against Mr. Williams.

Letter from Robert H. Goldsmith to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA)

Robert Goldsmith sends a contribution and expresses his support of Dr. King's Christian methods to attain full integration and civil rights. He discusses Dr. King's campaign to end the Vietnam War and asserts that the country is engaged in an immoral action in Southeast Asia.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961
Baltimore, MD, Jackson, MS, Maryland (MD), Mississippi (MS)

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Ludwig Meyer to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

Ludwig Meyer, Chairman of the Frankford Friends Meeting's Forum Committee, invites Dr. King to speak at his organization. Meyer states that if the date of the event is not convenient, he would like Coretta Scott King to be present.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967
Selma, AL

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Letter from Gladys Bilcher to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA)

Gladys Bilcher writes Dr. King expressing her enjoyment of one of Dr. King's speeches. This particular speech denouncing the war in Vietnam was given exactly one year before Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967
New York, NY

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Oklahoma (OK), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

California (CA), Atlanta, GA

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

The Poor People's Campaign Informational Flyer

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference circulates an informational flyer for The Poor Peoples Campaign held in Washington, D.C. This demonstration is to highlight the grave problems of the poor and is a call to the government to address the needs of the poor.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, THAILAND, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter From Ms. Gretchen Johnston to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C.

Gretchen Johnston, a Caucasian Quaker, expresses her support and gratitude to Dr. King regarding the employment of women, integration of schools, and awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Rockefeller writes Dr. King expressing his support for the work King is doing and asserts his desire to assist him in any way.

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962
Albany, GA

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Program: The Call To Worship

Sunday, July 11, 1965
California (CA)

This program outlines the order of service at Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, California. Dr. King is highlighted as the guest speaker at the Sunday morning service.

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.