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Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

Letter from Johan Mulert to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

Mr. Mulert requests for Dr. King to send him an autograph and a photo.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.

Telegram from Agnes Milthers to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

Agnes Milthers, a member of the Danish sections of Women International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Letter from Edward Enyedy to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Mr. Enyedy writes to Dr. King to inform him of a mock Presidential convention sponsored by TIME Magazine and asks Dr. King for any campaign material he can provide.

Letter from Rev. Grover Graham to MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Rev. Graham writes Dr. King thanking him for a previous letter and sends his support for Dr. King's leadership in the nonviolent pursuit of civil rights

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from Jesse Jackson to Negro Businessmen

Saturday, February 11, 1967

Reverend Jesse L. Jackson informs Negro Businessmen on the requirements for attending the Businessmen's Workshop sponsored by Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Congressman Emanuel Celler to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Democratic New York Congressman Emanuel Celler thanks Dr. King for the telegram regarding the passage of the 1964 civil rights bill by the House of Representatives. Celler also remarks that Dr. King's service contributed to the passage of the bill.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Ronnie Williams 23rd Anniversary

This flyer promotes the Ronnie Williams 23rd Anniversary concert at Symphony Hall in Newark. The featured performers include the 5 Blind Boys of Alabama, Shirley Caesar and the Reverend James Cleveland.

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Friday, April 10, 1964

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."