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Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Uvee Arbouin

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. and Mrs. King write Uvee Arbouin to commend her Christian leadership and devotion to Jesus Christ.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Letter from MLK to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Saturday, April 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Mr. T. W. Cole and the members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. for supporting the SCLC financially and morally. Dr. King is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Nonviolence

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Neighborhood Stabilization: A Program

Sunday, May 1, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Texas (TX)

The Southern Regional Council issues a special report regarding neighborhood stabilization. The report investigates minority housing in majority white communities. The report states that realtors victimize Negro residents and lead white residents to believe that Negroes cause property decline. The report also features a step-by-step self-help plan for a more organized, unified and stabilized community.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
FRANCE, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

Letter from the Children of Bulstrode School to MLK

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

The Bullstrode School Children write Dr. King to inform him of their fundraising efforts with the sale of daffodils from their community garden in hopes that it will assist poor Negro children.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Maryland (MD)

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Missouri (MO)

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Richard Chapin to S.C.L.C Board of Directors

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Michigan (MI)

The East Lansing Human Relations Commission writes to express their heartfelt sorrow over the tragic loss of Dr. King. They vow to continue the work of advancing freedom with renewed effort.

Letter to MLK Regarding Swedish Record Sales

Monday, April 25, 1966
SWEDEN

Chris Folcker follows up with Dr. King regarding sales figures and payments related to the sale of a recording in Sweden.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Social and Economic Characteristics of Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1960

Atlanta, GA

The Greater Atlanta Council on Human Relations outlines demographics of the Metro-Atlanta area in 1960. The areas of focus include population distribution, sanitation, and housing conditions.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Berkeley, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962
Iowa (IA), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO)

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.