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Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Voter Registration Campaige in Atlanta

This document provides a historical reference of voter registration campaigns held in Atlanta, Georgia. The information includes participating organizations as well as strategies and overall goals.

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Letter from David Ben-Gurion to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

Mr. Ben-Gurion, founder and first prime minister of Israel, congratulates Dr. King on his decision to lead a mass pilgrimage to Israel and Jordan. He also informs King that he is planning a trip to the US and looks forward to the opportunity of meeting in person. The pilgrimage, scheduled for November 1967, did not take place because of the Six Day Arab-Israeli War that June.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Telegram from MLK to Sheraton Lincoln Hotel

Monday, October 9, 1967

Dr. King makes a reservation with the Sheraton Lincoln Hotel in Texas.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Friday, August 30, 1963

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Letter from Hosea Williams to MLK

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Hosea Williams submits his resignation as a staff member of the SCLC. He also requests a meeting with the Steering Committee and Dr. King to discuss unfinished items related to the SCLC.

Letter from Charles H. Walter to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Charles Walters notifies Dora McDonald that he is sending a copy of the current edition of Labor Today. Walters requests an 1100 word article and photo from Dr. King for the forthcoming issue.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."