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Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK

Monday, December 20, 1965

Tadashi Akaishi, Associate Book Editor for John Knox Press, writes Dr. King requesting to use his endorsement for Dr. Kyle Haselden's book "Mandate for White Christians" as the book's preface. The endorsement was initially to be included on the book's cover, but Akaishi feels that it is so well written that he now asks permission to use it as the preface.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Lincoln

Dr. King gives a brief description of the timeline for Abraham Lincoln. He describes Lincoln's many defeats and eventual presidential triumph.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Letter from Toyozo Takata to MLK

Toyozo Takata writes Dr. King thanking him for enduring all negativity when fighting for peace.

Letter from MLK to John Williams Mannix

Monday, September 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Mr. Mannix that he will not be able to speak in Washington for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association.

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Letter from Chester Harness to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1967

Chester Harness expresses to Dr. King his interest of being an honorary member of SCLC. He explains that due to the Vietnam War he can not make a financial contribution but he would like to contribute by participating in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

Monday, September 5, 1966

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

University of Wisconsin Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

This is a contract from the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago signed by Darrel R. Douglas, of the University of Wisconsin. It records the stipulations agreed upon for Dr. King to deliver a speech.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

AFON received a grant of $60,000 from the Stern Family Fund. Mr. Wachtel offers Mr. Hunter a report of progress and invites him to a conference concerning the grant.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964

Nils K. Stahle, Executive Director of the Nobel Foundation, invites Dr. King to visit the Nobel House in Stockholm while he is Sweden for a special ecumenical service.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Religion

Dr. King records William Ernest Hocking's definition of religion. Hocking's first name is omitted on the note card.

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.