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How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS)

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Selma, AL

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Religion (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966
Nevada (NV), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Harris Family

Albany, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King send condolences to Katie Harris upon the passing of Alphonso. The Kings remembered Alphonso as "a great and dedicated worker in the struggle for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

Monday, February 5, 1968
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Wisdom

Here Dr. King quotes Proverbs 8:22-23 and sketches his view that "Wisdom was created by God before the earth was created, and it aids him [sic] [in] the creative process."

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from Wendell Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Wendell Thomas sends Dr. King his support along with a copy of the digest for his recent book, "Toward a World Culture."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Crozer Theological Seminary Comprehensive Examinations

Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The following is a detailed overview of comprehensive examinations at the Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Exams are both written and oral. "The purpose of the oral examination is to discover the student's ability to think in an integrative manner over all the areas of the theological education."

God

Dr. King quantifies the capabilities of God's will through Job 42:2 and the affirmation that God is able do everything.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.

Poster: This Store Is Against Equal Opportunities for Negroes

Texas (TX)

The SCLC placed this type of boycott poster on the storefronts of businesses that refused to provide equal job opportunities to Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962
New York (NY)

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.