Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"EGYPT"

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Washington, D.C.

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

Jackson, MS

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

The A. Philip Randolph Institute

New York, NY

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Chicago, IL

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this copy printed in "The Christian Century," Dr. King writes his letter in response to several Alabama Clergymen who accuse him of being unwise and untimely. His accusers call him an extremist and an "outside agitator" who should not be in Alabama. Dr. King references several sources in his counter to their arguments.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, GREECE, ITALY

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL)

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from Rev. Thurman Goodman to MLK

California (CA)

In this letter, Mr. Goodman writes Dr. King inquiring about a position in a new organization in Oakland, CA that works to uplift the black race.

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Denver, CO, Atlanta, GA, INDIA

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 27, 1963
London, England

H. C. Whitley invites Dr. King to the St. Giles' Lectures during Holy Week, preceding Easter of 1964. The cathedral has experienced some notable leaders and would like to continue their caliber of speakers through Dr. King's appearance.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 8, 1964
NORWAY

In this letter,Joan Daves informs Dr. King that an offer for a Norwegian edition of "Strength to Love" has been made. Joan also mentions that contracts have been made for Dr.King to sign.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967
London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to join the World Conference on Vietnam in Stockholm. The conference will include delegates from multiple peace organizations around the world to help protest the war in Vietnam.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Florida (FL)

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.