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Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Letter from A. T. Gabriel to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

A. T. Gabriel writes Dr. King enclosing monetary contributions from the Local Union and the Birmingham Committee for Civil Rights of Local 110. Gabriel asks that Dr. King acknowledge the contributions with a letter explaining the progress of his work.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

God (Zephaniah)

Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

Letter from Judy Palmer to MLK

Saturday, January 6, 1968

Judy Palmer agrees with Dr. King concerning the traffic jam in Washington D.C, and asks if Dr. King can befriend the White House.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Postcard from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

The Mayor of Jerusalem sends Dr. King a panoramic postcard of the city.

Letter Judith Van Swaringen to MLK

Tuesday, December 8, 1964

Judith Van Swaringen, a senior at Surrattaville High School in Clinton, Maryland, writes to Dr. King requesting information for her report dealing with the Reverend's steps leading to the Nobel Peace Prize.

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Western Union Telegram from Harrison Tweed and Bernard G. Segal to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Mr. Tweed and Mr. Segal urge Dr. King to observe Judge Johnson's order prohibiting marches to Montgomery, Alabama. They also enclose an excerpt of their telegram to Governor George Wallace compelling him to restrain law enforcement from excessive force.