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Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Western Union Telegram from Willie Bascomb to Dr. King

Wednesday, September 24, 1958

Willie Bascomb, of Montgomery, Alabama, addressed this telegram to Dr. King, wishing him a full recovery and well wishes.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy and MLK to Howard W. Creecy

Monday, June 19, 1967

Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy inform Reverend Creecy they will be serving a five day jail sentence for breaking an injunction against demonstrating in Birmingham, Alabama. It is for this reason that the Clergymen's Conference will have to be moved to a later date.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.


These notes highlight various conceptions of 'God' as revealed through Dr. King's scholarship.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Walter Simcich invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto, Ontario. He then asks Dr. King to suggest an alternate civil rights speaker if he is unable to attend.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."


Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

George A. Chauncey request to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

George A. Chauncey writes Dr. King to request copies of the "Annual Report of the President," a speech that was delivered at the 1967 meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Thomas Bradley to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Thomas Bradley, Los Angeles' Tenth District Councilman, requests Dr. King's support with a fundraising campaign.


Dr. King records a note on French scholar Ernest Renan's prophecy in relation to God.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Dr. S. M. Sophocles to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Dr. S. M. Sophocles invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights at a cultural program for Pennsylvania Military College.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.


Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."


Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

Thursday, June 17, 1965

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."


Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.