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Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

WBBM-TV: Ban Further Marches

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This report by WBBM-TV of Chicago states that 60% of their feedback panelists would prefer the banning of further civil rights marches to reduce racial tension. Other questions posed include the perceived appropriate police response, the effect on neighborhoods, and Dr. King's influence in Chicago.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Letter from MLK to Mr. W David Angus

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Dr. King is responding to the invitation given by W. David Angus. He regrettably informs Angus that due to his overcrowded schedule, he is unable to speak in Montreal. He suggests Reverend Ralph Abernathy as a more than adequate alternative to speak.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Letter from Elbert Ransom Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 18, 1966

In this letter from Mr. Ransom to Dr. King the former welcomes Dr. King to "our complexed [sic] city." The author also expresses nostalgia for previous shared experiences and his hopes for the future of the movement.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from Richard Sand to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Richard Sand, of the New York Vietnam Summer, requested that Dr. King forward autographed photographs to the New York office.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Get Well Message to MLK from the Anderson Family

The Anderson family wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery and informs him of a recent meeting with Rev. Kelley.

Telegram from MLK to Terry Shaw

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Dr. King telegrams Terry Shaw stating that the staff of SCLC sends their "deepest sympathy" in his time of grief.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter, dated February 9,1968, was sent to Mr.Daugherty from Dr. King. In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Daugherty for his contribution to the SCLC. He apologizes for being "tardy" in writing to him.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.

Letter to Harry J. Cargas from Dora McDonald

Monday, December 9, 1963

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Cargas' letter which included an enclosure of the December issue of "The Queen's Work,"a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society. Ms. McDonald tells the sender that Dr. King is out of town, and the package will be brought to his attention upon his return to Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Catholicism

Dr. King references American theologian Niebuhr's ideas regarding Catholicism and quotes, "It pretended that the church could mediate the divine, mercy and judgement without itself standing under that judgement or requiring that mercy." This quotes derives from Niebuhr's book "The Pope's Domesticated God."

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

Letter from MLK Regarding Southern Christian Leadership Conference

In this letter, Dr. King appeals to the potential donors of the S.C.L.C. Dr. King also highlights a number of activities the S.C.L.C. has organized with the purpose of securing voting rights and raising funds for churches burned by segregationists.

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.