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MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Oslo, Norway, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from William A. Lawson to MLK

Friday, May 1, 1964
Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, LEBANON

William A. Lawson extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to an assembly at Texas Southern University.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., JAMAICA

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Chicago, IL

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

History

Dr. King reflects on history as it pertains to human society.

Letter from "The Nation" to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

"The Nation" sends Dr. King payment for his article, "Let Justice Roll Down." The article was published in the March 15, 1965 edition of the publication.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Florida (FL), Jacksonville, FL

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Notecard Regarding the Religion of Feeling

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines several and their views on the psychology of religious beliefs. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Maurice N. Eisendrath to Dr. Bernard Lee

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Maurice N. Eisendrath request Dr. Bernard Lee to provide a list of the contributors from Dr. King's address to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. The list is to facilitate Mr. Eisendrath in contacting other contributors to raise additional funds for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

Washington, D.C.

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.