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Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, November 12, 1965

Monica Wilson invites Dr. King to deliver the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town. She explains that they do not have a large budget but are willing to pay for travel and hotel expenses.


Dr. King notes that Kierkegaard reversed the Hegelian dialectic.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gardner Lattimer

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Lattimer for his letter expressing support for Dr. King and his work. He then talks about the importance of making the number of those seeking peace through non-violence known to the public and the government. King continues, commenting on the War in Vietnam and the international adoption of peace through non-violence.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.


Dr. King reflects on history as it pertains to human society.

Letter from the Employees of Western Yard to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964

The Employees of Western Yard of Detroit send a contribution to Dr. King. The employees highlight citizenship training, literacy education and voter registration as the top initiatives of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Choice 68 Request for Information

The students of the Catholic University of America are participating in the Choice 68' elections and request that Dr. King provide information of himself so that they may further promote his Presidential candidacy.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

Monday, November 22, 1965

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.


Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.


Dr. King cites a publication by theologian Albert Knudson.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Saturday, May 23, 1964

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller thanks Dr. King for sending an advance copy, with inscription, of his new book.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Friday, July 31, 1964

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Tobe Johnson asks Dr. King and other members of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees to fill out a questionnaire in preparation for re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.