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Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., CANADA

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Letter of Invite from M. J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, M. J. Jones invites Dr. King and Mrs. King to be his guest at a dinner with Dr. L. Harold DeWolf. DeWolf is delivering three lectures over the course of two days, to which Dr. and Mrs. King are also invited.

Notecard regarding science

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science.This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

B. Clifton Reardon Recap of William Temple

London, England, New York (NY)

This is an essay written by B. Clifton Reardon on William Temple, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Temple was one of the founding members of the Council of Christians and Jews.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.


Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Cable from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Payment

Monday, January 29, 1968

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King references payment by Editora Senzala Ltd. for the Portuguese-language rights to "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968
California (CA)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY)

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter of Support from Lars Sodersten to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, AUSTRALIA

Lars Sodersten offers support to the civil rights movement on behalf of concerned Swedish residents. He also informed Dr. King of his plans to raise money for SCLC and the movement.

Did President Kennedy Die in Vain

"Did President Kennedy Die In Vain" describes the author's request that we elect officials with a higher moral bearing and adherence to Christian principles.

Appeal to Community Business People

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document is a letter from the Greater Chicago Scavenger Association to Negro citizens. The letter informs the citizens of the beneficial affect that The Greater Chicago Scavenger Association can have on them and their community.

Letter From Roberta S. Felton to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 1, 1962
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA

Roberta S. Felton writes to Dora McDonald in recognition and thanks for the letter she received.

Messages From Dora McDonald to Dr. King

Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, London, England, Atlanta, GA

Notes from Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, detailing phone messages from key movement stakeholders and colleagues.

Letter to Miss Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 24, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

This letter includes a $500 check from Mr. Sidney Emerman and a copy of two letters between the author and Emerman. Additionally, the author encloses two checks totaling $435 from Mr. Clifford Joseph who donated proceeds from Christmas cards that he designed and printed.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stroh to the S.C.L.C.

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Nashville, TN

In this letter, dated January 4, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

Missouri (MO)

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.


Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York, NY

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Letter from Glenn T. Izutsu to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
Hawaii (HI)

Mr. Izutsu, President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize and recalls a visit by Dr. King earlier in the year.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), MEXICO, VIETNAM

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Letter to Wallace Webster from MLK

Tuesday, December 29, 1964
Washington (WA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Webster's invitation, but informs him that he has decided to commit more time to the civil rights struggle and is unable to accept.