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"ETHIOPIA"

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Lula Belle Williams to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Lula Williams writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help to pay her rent before she is evicted.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Request Letter from Joan Kasabach to Dr. King

Sunday, March 6, 1966

In this letter. Joan Kasabach is writing Dr.King to notify him of a speech program she is launching at Bloom Township High School and Community College. Kasabach request that Dr. King offer any comments or suggestions to add as she is developing the program.

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Letter from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Monday, November 23, 1964

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, encourages Dr. King to accept an invitation to address sessions of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention sent earlier by Dr. Paul L. Sturges.

Letter from L. H. Stibbards to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Mr. Stibbards sends a donation and words of encouragement from the McMaster Divinity Student's Association. He assures Dr. King that their members are at Dr. King's service.

Huntley Thomas Writes MLK About His New Production

Thomas Huntley tells Dr. King that he is the first in Atlanta to get a copy of his new production and asks for Dr. Kings opinion.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca

This form letter from the Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca and the Cornell Committee Against Segregation announces both the guest appearance of Dr. King as well as a fundraising drive for the SCLC.

Capitalism

Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

Operation Breadbasket Pamphlet

This pamphlet describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Operation Breadbasket initiative.

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

Monday, February 5, 1968

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

Saturday, October 17, 1964

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

Letter from Elaine Hinde to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Elaine Hinde inquires about materials and information from Dr. King in regards to Choice '68.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."