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What Do You Believe About Fair Housing?

This brochure was provided to the public to dispell the myths and solidify the facts of the fair housing market.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Johnnie Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones requests that Dr. King send $54.00 to his home to help with his bills. Mr. Jones also requests that Dr. King consider him for painting services.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Philosophy Defined

Dr. King documents statements regarding the function of philosophy.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Faith"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Faith," Dr. King writes out some thoughts on the subject.

Letter from MLK to Sammy Davis Jr.

In this handwritten telegram draft, Dr. King informs Sammy Davis Jr. that his concerts in Chicago will not interfere with the movement. Dr. King goes on to suggest that one of Sammy Davis Jr.'s concerts be a benefit show for the Chicago Freedom Movement.

SCLC: Tenth Annual Convention

This program denotes the key leaders for the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC held in Jackson, Mississippi. It also outlines the timeline of events for the four-day convention, noting a foreword written by Dr. King.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Contribution Letter from Motown Records

Thursday, September 5, 1963

As indicated in a recording agreement with Dr. King, Esther Edwards, Vice President of Motown Records, sends $200.00 to the SCLC.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from James P. Twomey to P. N. Brownstein

Monday, September 23, 1968

James Twomey writes P. N. Brownstein to express his pleasure in receiving Mr. Brownstein's letter informing him of the $4,000,000 the FHA-HUD has allocated for the housing rehabilitation program that Dr. King proposed.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Rejection Letter from MLK to Areatha G. Bailey Regarding the Freedom Fund Dinner

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King informs Areatha G. Bailey that he will not be able to attend the Freedom Fund Dinner.

Letter from MLK

This is a partial letter from Dr. King in an effort to raise funds for SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.