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Letter from Rev. Herbert H. Eaton to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Reverend Eaton, pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, congratulates Dr. and Mrs. King on the birth of their child, Edith Bernice.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Nobel Peace Prize Dinner Program

Monday, January 27, 1964
Atlanta, GA

The citizens of Atlanta held a recognition dinner on January 27, 1965 to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize. Tributes were offered by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., AME Bishop Ernest Hickman, Rev. Edward Driscoll of the Georgia Council of Churches, State Senator Leroy Johnson, and Roman Catholic Archbishop Paul Hallinan. Dr. King gave the address.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Tuesday, February 19, 1963
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

California (CA), Texas (TX)

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
Johannesburg, South Africa, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

ISRAEL

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Letter from Kenneth Pierce to MLK

Kenneth Pierce was recently released from Fulton County jail and informs Dr. King that he would like to speak to him about an "important situation." Mr. Pierce also references another cellmate who would like to communicate to Dr. King or one of his representatives as well.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA, Des Moines, IA, Georgia (GA)

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
San Francisco, CA

Subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King, three posters are erected in San Francisco to express the opposition to his death and the continuance of the movement. Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy is instructed to show these posters to Coretta Scott King at an appropriate time.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Hatfield, Mark O., Malik, Charles Habib, Lincoln, Abraham, MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964., Minnesota (MN), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, South Africa, EGYPT, SYRIA, IRAQ, ISRAEL, JORDAN, CUBA, CHINA, Alabama (AL), INDONESIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, PORTUGAL, JAPAN

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Joint Memorandum of Intern Regarding the Death of James Reeb

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Unitarian Universalist Association, and the American Friends Service Committee have each established a James Reeb Memorial Fund. The purpose of these funds are to provide financial assistance to those who are personally involved in the struggle for equal rights. James Reeb was a white civil rights activist who was brutally murdered by white segregationists in Selma, 1965.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Program for MLK's Baccalaureate Commencement

Sunday, June 7, 1959
Boston, MA

This program is from Dr. King's Baccalaureate Commencement at Boston University.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, ITALY, VIETNAM

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
BRAZIL, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965
New York (NY), Boston, MA, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.