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"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

This is a sermon chapter and possible draft for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." Dr. King writes from the perspective of Paul the Apostle. Through the words of King, Paul speaks to modern day American Christians and challenges them to uphold true Christian values. Paul notes the presence of economic, scientific, and technological development, yet questions the contradiction of social injustices in a society that seems so advanced.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

MLK Itinerary

This document details the meetings and events set to take place during Dr. King's trip to Europe, Asia, Africa and Hawaii over a 55 day span.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Letters from Pearce Godfrey to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Pearce Godfrey forwards to Dr. King several letters that he has written concerning his views on United States involvement in Vietnam, the usage of "under God" in the pledge of allegiance, and John F. Kennedy's statement before the United Nations that "life is unfair."

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from Preston Smith to MLK

Wednesday, June 6, 1962

Preston Smith of the Program Committee of Zion Baptist Church inquires if Dr. King can speak to the people of Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Letter from Alice Peterson to MLK

Peterson writes Dr. King with her predictions and shares her past accomplishments and future plans.

Sermon Notes on Character

This document contains Dr. King's notes on character.

Letter from James Shipman to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

James Shipman writes Dr. King to request his presence at the 1st annual meeting for the Education Association for Community-Junior Colleges, as their main speaker. Shipman gives the Reverend option to choose a date convenient for him, a week in either direction from April 20, 1968.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from James E. Doherty to MLK Regarding School Desegregation

Monday, September 4, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Doherty encloses an article that includes civil right leaders views on school desegregation.

Letter from Pauline Wren to MLK

Pauline Wren criticizes Dr. King for his endorsement of Adam Clayton Powell and asks for the immediate return of some "work" that was entrusted to Dr. King as a "minister and gentleman."

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.