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"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Letter from Dr. S. M. Sophocles to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. S. M. Sophocles invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights at a cultural program for Pennsylvania Military College.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Religion

Dr. King comments on Plato's view of religion and records a quote from A.G. Keller's "Science and Society."

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

Civil Rights and Vietnam

California (CA), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, VIETNAM

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Nashville, TN

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL)

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

Monday, August 21, 1967
CHINA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Georgia (GA)

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Oslo, Norway

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter from MLK to Walter Harding

Friday, November 26, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the dedication of Walter Hardin's book. Walter Hardin was considered a distinguished professor and scholar at State University College of Geneseo, New York.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter from Sankey Blanton to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1951
Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Chester, PA

Sankey Blanton, of Crozer Theological Seminary, sends Martin Luther King, Jr. half of his fellowship grant for the 1951-1952 academic year. A second check will be sent when they have received his first semester grades and registration for the second semester.

Letter from Carl Shipley to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Carl Shipley, Head of the Republican State Committee for the District of Columbia, thanks Dr. King for his address at the National Press Club. Shipley expresses that despite the reservations of many individuals regarding Dr. King's emphasis on civil disobedience, the overall support of his speech was highly satisfactory.

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Thursday, October 9, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.