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"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Letter from MLK to Clarence E. Pickett

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Pickett of American Friends Service Committee, he has accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements allowable for the next year or longer.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Boston University Graduation Exercises

Sunday, June 5, 1955

Boston University awards an honorary PhD of Laws to John F. Kennedy.

Southern Christian Leadership Rally Souvenir Program

Friday, October 18, 1963

This is the 1963 Souvenir Program for the Southern Christian Leadership Rally, an initiative of the citizens civic planning committee. Dr. King is honored as an audacious leader.

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

Letter of Thanks from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for financial support to the college.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Telegram from C. Dolores Tucker to MLK and Others

Friday, November 3, 1967

C. Dolores Tucker offers some words of encouragement to Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker during their incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

Friday, June 19, 1964

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Telegram from Walter Friedrich to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Walter Friedrich, on behalf of the Peace Council of the German Democratic Republic, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Telegram from George Meares to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

On behalf of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, George Meares expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts and achievements.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Tom Offenburger and Stan Levison plan to do a story on the Cleveland project and justify the expenses involved as necessary in the process of field research.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.