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"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Old Testament History Notes

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Greek Philosophy Subject Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King points to the aim of Greek Philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs Sends Best Wishes for 1960

This card reflects the various dates in which progress has been made in the struggle for equal rights for all. In this card Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs also gives their best wishes for 1960.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Letter from MLK to Hobson R. Reynolds

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King responds to an invitation from earlier in the year Hobson R. Reynolds. King states that because he is out of town frequently and receives a lot of incoming and outgoing mail sometimes letters are placed in the wrong place. King reference to a trip to Africa that he planned to visit, but was cancelled because of Watts riots in California. King thanks Mr. Reynolds for his contributions to the SCLC and says that he wishes to serve him in the future.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).