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"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

The Gibson Report

Monday, April 1, 1968

The Gibson Report illustrates the economic status of employed and unemployed African American women in the U.S. It also compared the incomes of white and black Americans.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

MLK Notecard - "Revelation"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Revelation," Dr. King quotes from Niebuhr's NDM, I, 127.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

The Poor People's Campaign Informational Flyer

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference circulates an informational flyer for The Poor Peoples Campaign held in Washington, D.C. This demonstration is to highlight the grave problems of the poor and is a call to the government to address the needs of the poor.

Letter from Cindy Eder to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Cindy Eder sends Dr. King warm wishes for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves relays information to Dr. King regarding new publishing opportunities. She writes, "Greece, which has thus far been completely impossible for any foreign rights sales, is "opening up" and it is possible to place certain books for publication in that territory."

Letter from Lawrence Guyot to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Lawrence Guyot of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party seeks Dr. King's support for the Mississippi election campaign.

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

A Message from Heaven by Eugenia Singleton

In honor of Dr. King's death, Ms. Eugenia Singleton composes this poem. Throughout the piece, Ms. Singleton makes several parallels between Dr. King and Jesus Christ.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.