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Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Letter from David R. Echeldfer to MLK

David Echeldfer sends a copy of the Time Magazine with Dr. King on the cover and requests his autograph, and for King to return the magazine by mail.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Letter from MLK to Thomas K. Gilhool

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Dr. King apologizes for his tardy response to a previous letter from Thomas Gilhool. He also expresses regret for his inability to speak at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Letter from the American Broadcasting Company to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Kay Murphy, Manager of ABC's Literary Rights Division, thanks Dr. King for giving permission to the television network to quote from "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on the program "Directions '64." She also provides information about the specific program, which is a religious series focusing on "the current Negro crisis in America."

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.


Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King writes about Irish philosopher and theologian John Scotus Eriugena. He records a quote that states, "Authority comes from reason not reason from authority."

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from the Ford Foundation to Chauncey Eskridge

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

A member of the Ford Foundation informs the Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation, Chauncey Eskridge, that the Ford Foundation approved a $230,000 grant to the SCLF.

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK regarding Moulin Rouge Resort Motel

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this letter to King, dated December 13, 1966, Fruchter informs King that reservations were made for him at the Moulin Rouge Resort Motel in Miami Beach, FL by Henry Arrington.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.