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"FRANCE"

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Atlantic City, NJ, Michigan (MI), Kentucky (KY)

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

New Wine in New Bottles

Dr. King outlines a sermon he preached at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery on October 17, 1954. His text is Matthew 9:17. He compares new ideas to new wine, stating that an idea cannot progress if people are not ready to accept it; this is what it means for an idea to be before its time. New ideas require new structures to contain them. The same is true in our personal lives when we resolve to rid ourselves of bad habits.

Letter from Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Democratic Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner asks Dr. King to help with a project that will commemorate the 200th anniversary of US independence. Weltner requests that Dr. King write a letter in which he discusses the problems that democracy will face in the coming decade. Weltner also encloses a related document entitled, "A Proposal for the Formation of a Committee of Correspondence."

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Massachusetts (MA)

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Playboy Magazine to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Doug Benson writes on behalf of Hugh Hefner in response to a letter from Dr. King requesting donations. Benson informs Dr. King that Mr. Hefner, who supports the civil rights struggle, suggests placing a shorter, more personalized, appeal for funds in The Playboy Forum.

The Martin Luther King Column

New York (NY), Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Bloody Sunday

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

God

Dr. King quotes Psalms 111:3 and writes that "here is the familiar emphasis of the mercy and grace of God."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
NORWAY, INDIA

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Workers Defense League Docket

Chicago, IL, HAITI, SOUTH AFRICA

The Workers Defense League was an organization that defended workers in the interest of social and economic justice. This docket is simply a schedule of the upcoming proceedings in a court of law. The lawsuits deal with immigration, selective service, and the rights of the mentally ill, to name a few.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Clinton Warner

Thursday, May 20, 1965
Atlanta, GA

In this telegram, Dr. King informs Dr. Clinton Warner of Sammy Davis Jr.'s performance at a freedom benefit concert being sponsored by the SCLC. Dr. King then requests that Dr. Warner serve as one of the honorary chairman of the event.

Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961
Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Kentucky (KY), West Virginia (WV), Oklahoma (OK), North Carolina (NC), Missouri (MO), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

Telegram from J.C. Willimas and George Moore to the National Education Association of America

Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Williams writes to the National Education Association of America requesting an immediate investigation take place on behalf of the Atlanta School System. He suggests that discriminatory practices are present.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."