Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"FRANCE"

SCLC Mail Log: February 23, 1968

Friday, February 23, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondence that came through the office.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

Prayer Support from Canada

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Carl H. Woodbeck, publisher of Africa Speaks, writes a letter of support and prayer to Dr. King.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Letter from James G. T. Fairfield to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

"Alive" magazine editor James G. T. Fairfield expresses gratitude to Dr. King for sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here." Fairfield also sends several copies of his magazine, a publication of Mennonite Broadcasting which published an excerpt of Dr. King's "Riverside" speech.

Netherlands Request Autograph

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Theo Roling, of The Netherlands, urges Dr. King to promote peace in the world. He requests Dr. King's signature for his Nobel Prize autograph collection.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Thursday, August 22, 1963

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Letter from Wisconsin Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1961

The Racine Chapter of the NAACP Banquet Committee invites Dr. King to speak at their annual banquet.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

SCLC SCOPE Pamphlet

This pamphlet is a product of the Summer Community Organization and Political Education project (SCOPE), a project initiated by the SCLC dedicated to increasing voter participation and political education in Alabama and throughout the South. The pamphlet highlights several common economic and political issues that face Negro communities.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Sixth Grade Wisconsin Achievement Test Responses

This is a collection of responses from sixth graders of average ability in a Wisconsin school. Although the instructions are not provided, it seems evident that the students were tasked to paraphrase the passage or, simply tell what the passage meant to them.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Letter from Nicholas Gage to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

In this letter dated May 8, 1967, Nicholas Gage writes to Dr. King. Mr. Gage, who works for the Boston Herald, thanks Dr. King for allowing him to interview him. He encloses a copy of the story of the interview that Dr. King gave him.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stoh to the SCLC

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this letter, dated February 22, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, Governor of Jerusalem, writes Dr. King regarding his planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Katib assures Dr. King that he will be well-taken care of and shows sincere appreciation that he plans to visit Jerusalem.

Letter from Robert Markowitz to MLK

Tuesday, January 1, 1963

Robert Markowitz, general manager of the Hampton House, sends Dr. King a request for reservations during the week of a golf tournament. He also lists the occupancy rates for the rooms.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.