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"FRANCE"

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from Ernest C. Copper to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Ernest Cooper, Executive Director of the Urban League of Cleveland, seeks a meeting with Dr. King to discuss how the two agencies can cooperate on the tentative Cleveland program announced by SCLC.

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ALGERIA

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

God

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Letter from MLK to Thomas K. Gilhool

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King apologizes for his tardy response to a previous letter from Thomas Gilhool. He also expresses regret for his inability to speak at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter from Patrick V. McNamara to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Pat McNamara, U.S. Senator from Michigan, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for his letter of recent date regarding efforts to strip the poll tax prohibition from the voting rights bill.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Monday, January 15, 1968
GEORGIA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from Lewis W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Alabama (AL)

Lewis W. Jones worries about Dr. King because of the recent turmoil he has faced. He hopes that the struggles King has faced recently does not undermine his position in the movement.

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962
Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA, Pittsburgh, PA, SOUTH AFRICA

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958
MEXICO

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

MLK Memo on the Civil Rights Bill

Dr. King initialed this memo praising the passage of the civil rights bill. The memo points out that its passage is a "bright interlude" in the struggle for civil rights.

March for Poor People

Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

God (Jeremiah)

Dr. King discusses the creating powers of God.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Men Who Live Differently

Illinois (IL), Tokyo, Japan

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.