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God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Royalties Earned from "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

This document references royalties earned in the amount $39.00 from the Van Logham Slaterus' publication of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Sin

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

MLK Notecard Regarding "Gallican Confession"

This is a notecard handwritten by Dr. King on the topic "Gallican Confession."

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Rodney Culman requests that Dr. King consent to serve as the Co-Chairman of a potential meeting between Lord Boyd Orr, the Chairman of the New World Food Crisis Committee, and the U.S. President.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Hubert Jones

Monday, August 26, 1963

Mr. Walker, SCLC Executive Assistant, responds on behalf of Dr. King to Hubert Jones regarding a "nation-wide project." Walker feels that the project would be premature at the moment and explains that his efforts locally would be valuable.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

Preaching

Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.