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Letter from National Press Club to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

A representative from the National Press Club (Washington, D.C.) writes to Dr. King, asking him to review and correct any inaccuracies in a transcription from a Q & A that took place at the Press Club.

University of West Indies News Release

Thursday, May 27, 1965

The University of West Indies releases a statement announcing Dr. King's acceptance to preach the University's Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to the SCLC

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Ralph Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary of the SCLC, submits the semi-annual financial report for the period of July 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 to the SCLC Board of Directors. He also commends his financial staff members for their good work.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Mr. Brita Hakansson

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Mr. Brita Hakansson to contact Dora McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in September of 1962.

Letter from Samuel A. Clarke to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter, Samuel A. Clarke, the program director of the St. Andrews Church in New York, inquires about an earlier invitation sent to Dr. King, asking him to speak at "Men's Day," 1966.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Essie M. Perry

Thursday, January 3, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Essie M. Perry to discuss Dr. King's availability to speak at Lane College for the 50th Anniversary of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Dr. King informs Mrs. McDonald that his schedule is too strenuous to engage into this wonderful opportunity.

Love in Action

Dr. King expounds on the love of God by referencing a verse from the Bible in the Book of Luke. The verse states, "Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." Dr. King notes the truth of this verse is also revealed in race relation of today.

Letter from Contributor to MLK

Thursday, July 28, 1966

The author offers support for the SCLC but is critical of Dr. King's interpretation of the term 'Black Power.' The author also suggests the formation of a third party candidate for the 1968 elections.

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Letter from Mrs. H.S. Johnson to Golden Frinks

Friday, January 19, 1968

In this letter Mrs. H.S. Johnson informs Mr. Golden Frinks of an enclosed letter forwarded from Mr. Richard Williamston of North Carolina.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.