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MLK Note Card - Abstract Elements and Sets

Dr. King discusses the philosopher Wh's perspective of the abstract element known as a moment.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Handwritten Note from Harry Wachtel to Dora McDonald

Harry Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes a note to Dora McDonald referencing an enclosure intended for Dr. King.

Letter from Member of SCLC to James Harrison

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The letter's author encloses copies of recent checks made payable to the SCLC and contact information for individual and organizational contributors.

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 21, 1964
Berlin, Germany, GERMANY

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes about plans for a reception and press conference in Bonn, Germany. Ms. Daves mentions that Dr. King may be asked to deliver an address.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

Letter from James Eby to MLK

Monday, October 5, 1964
Washington, D.C., Ohio (OH), Mississippi (MS)

Eby invites Dr.King to speak at Miami University due to "student interest in civil rights."

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, DENMARK, FRANCE

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Immortality

Dr. King highlights a quote from Harry Emerson Fosdick's book "Assurance of Immortality."

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Slum Building Seized

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This article includes multiple viewpoints regarding Dr. King and the seizure of a slum building in Chicago.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Thursday, November 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., South Africa

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Iowa (IA)

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
New York, NY

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.

Letter from Diane M. Monk to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 16, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Ms. Monk, a student, thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance with a school report. Monk also suggests that other students be instructed to read Dr. King's books, particularly "Stride for Freedom," for valuable information.