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"GEORGIA"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967
California (CA)

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter from Jerome Karlin to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Jerome B. Karlin expresses his admiration for Dr. King's dedication to the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Karlin highlights the importance of Dr. King's ideals and the continuation of the fight for social justice.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Crozer Theological Seminary Telethon

Pennsylvania (PA), Chester, PA

Crozer Theological Seminary, Dr. Kings alma mater, issues a solicitation for contributions to its almnus. The letter states that alumni receiving the letter were not able to be reached during the "Crozer Alumni Telethon." Dr. King attended the religious institution from 1948-1951 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Morehouse College.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

Letter to M.C. Gettinger Regarding Hosea Williams

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King expresses his regret concerning a remark made by Mr. Hosea Williams which Mr. Gettinger perceived as Anti-Semitic, during Mr. Williams' address to Spelman College.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY)

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York, NY

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Louisiana (LA), Birmingham, AL

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Letter from the South African Consulate

Friday, February 11, 1966
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The South African Consulate-General informs Dr. King that his application for a visa to enter South Africa is being taken into consideration. He informs Dr. King that he would be informed shortly of the decision regarding his request.