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Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

Dr. Abernathy Says Full Steam Ahead in '67

Friday, January 6, 1967

Dr. Abernathy recaps accomplishments of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 1966. He states several objectives for the organization's efforts for 1967.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

I'll Take My Stand

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Herbert Coulton to Friends

Herbert Coulton, SCLC Director of Affiliates, encourages more supporters to become church affiliates. Mr. Coulton informs readers that the "SCLC is commonly considered as the Social Action Arm of the Christian Churches in America."

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Friday, August 30, 1963

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

NYT Advertisement for Where Do We Go from Here?

This document is a New York Times advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The title of the ad offers the synopsis: "Martin Luther King, Jr. offers a hard-headed program for what we do next."

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Letter from MLK to Delta Sigma Theta

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter is in response to and appreciation of a contribution in the amount of $150 made, to the SCLC, by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.