Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"GERMANY"

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from MLK to Mildred Lynch

Monday, December 11, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Mildred Lynch's letter inviting him to visit Toronto. He expresses his appreciation but regretfully declines the invitation due to the future plans of the SCLC.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York, NY

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Telegram from Gunnar Jahn to MLK

Saturday, September 30, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this telegram, Mr. Jahn informs Dr. King that the postponement of his meeting in Moscow could cause the planned initiative to collapse.

Letter from William E. Duncan to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
Chicago, IL

The branch director of a Chicago based youth center welcomes Dr. King to their neighborhood. William Duncan conveys his support to Dr. King's initiatives for community revitalization. His letter was written at the beginning of a major campaign undertaken by Dr. King and SCLC to campaign for open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961
New York, NY

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gardner Lattimer

VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Lattimer for his letter expressing support for Dr. King and his work. He then talks about the importance of making the number of those seeking peace through non-violence known to the public and the government. King continues, commenting on the War in Vietnam and the international adoption of peace through non-violence.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Thursday, June 18, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter to Dr. King from Muriel Pettit

Friday, September 13, 1968
Washington (WA)

A supporter writes to Dr. King requesting information to be used in a research paper.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

President Johnson Requests Off the Record Conversation

Monday, February 13, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Clifford L. Alexander Jr., Deputy Special Counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson, conveys the President's request for an off the record meeting.

Campaign for a World Constitution Leaflet

New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), SWITZERLAND, ITALY, NETHERLANDS, INDIA

This pamphlet announces a World Constitutional Convention to be held in Switzerland. Dr. King, who was among the signers of a "Call for a Constitutional Convention," is quoted in the leaflet stating that a world government would lessen tensions.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Benjamin Hooks

Friday, November 11, 1966
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter Dr. King solicits the help of Mr. Hooks regarding allegations that SCLC associate Hosea Williams purchased stolen automobiles for SCLC. Dr. King asserts that the allegations should be investigated fully and enlists the aid of Benjamin Hooks, Chauncey Eskridge, and Joe Lowery.

Letter from Professor St. Clair Drake to MLK Regarding the Economic State of Negro People

California (CA)

In this letter, Standford University Professor of Sociology, St. Clair Drake, discusses his interest in launching a co-operative movement to aid the Negro people. Professor St. Clair Drake also mentions an enclosed newspaper.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.