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Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."

Telegram from the Nashville Student Movement to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960
Nashville, TN

The Nashville Nonviolent Student Movement writes to Dr. King in jail commending him for his courageous act, while urging him to remain in jail for the cause.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Letter from MLK to Bishop Randolph Clairborne

Monday, March 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Bishop Randolph Clairborne for his contribution to a dinner held in King's honor. The City of Atlanta sponsored a dinner for Dr. King in honor of his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.


Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Gift from James Allen to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, James Allen, of International Publishers, presents to Dr. King a copy of "The Autobiography of W.E.B. DuBois."

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Texas (TX)

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963
Ohio (OH)

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.


Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

God (Knowledge of)

Dr. King references St. Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Contra Gentiles" in a quotation focusing on man's "threefold knowledge of divine things."


Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.


Dr. King recalls a quote from British prime minister Winston Churchill and his tribute to King George VI.

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966
Washington (WA), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Harry Belafonte Concert Promotion

Monday, May 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Johannesburg, South Africa

The Belafonte Concert Committee reaches out to Atlanta music lovers for a show featuring Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Response to Reasons Why African Americans Should Boycott Whitey's Olympics

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
LIBERIA, Chicago, IL

The writer responds to an article in The Post on why African Americans should boycott the Olympics. He believes that Negroes should return to Africa or form their own community in the US separate from whites. God did not intend whites and Negroes to live together, the author maintains, or would have made them the same color. Negroes should take responsibility for their own condition rather than blaming whites. test

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."