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"GHANA"

Letter from Andree Dwan Gipson to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Andree Gipson, Director of the Human Rights Committee of the University Student Government, proposes a reception for Dr. King during his visit to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Gipson also sends Dr. King a copy of the student newspaper, POST, that announces the date of Dr. King's speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Charles Merrill for developing his ideas, being concerned about his health, and contributing funds that allow both work and rest.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Social Philosophy Seminar Outline

Dr. King’s outline of key figures and their respective works for the Social Philosophy course he taught at Morehouse College during the 1961-1962 academic year.

Telegram to MLK from Kjell Eide

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Kjell Eide requests Dr. King's participation in a peace delegation regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

Sunday, October 22, 1967

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

Letter from William G. Broaddus to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

The Editor of the Dicta column from The Virginia Law Weekly writes Dr. King to request a contribution to their "Law for the Poor" series. Mr. Broaddus states that an ideal article will discuss landlord tenant problems and offer solutions. He tells Dr. King that his work in Chicago "on the landlord tenant problem...[makes you] well qualified to write on this subject."

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Long Beach Dispatch: American Talking Back

In this letter to the editor, Mr. Joseph Holmes uses rhetorical questions and graphic imagery to illustrate respective positions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

MLK's Plans for Cleveland

Dr. King outlines programs and development that he will implement in Cleveland. King frequently went to Cleveland throughout his time as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

MLK's GRE Scores

Thursday, February 1, 1951

This report contains MLK's graduate record examination scores.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.