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"GHANA"

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

Invitation Program to the 1966 Upper Room Citation

The following document is an invitation program from the Rev. Dr. Manning and the Upper Room inviting guests to attend the 1966 Upper Room Citation at the Grand Ballroom, London Hilton Hotel in London, England.

God (Zephaniah)

Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Monday, July 17, 1967

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Tuesday, May 25, 1965

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.