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Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Creger

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to Mr. Creger's request to use "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" in his book. Ms. McDonald informs the author that the Letter is being expanded in an upcoming publication, therefore all requests for reprints are being denied. The Letter would eventually be published in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in 1964.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Letter from Ned and Augusta Thomas to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Ned and Augusta Thomas write Dr. King asking if SCLC is truly a "nonsectarian agency," then why is the word "Christian" a part of the name? They also state that they "strongly back" Dr. King's stand on Vietnam.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Nelson Rockefeller Telegram to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this telegram, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's secretary cancels his upcoming appointment with Dr. King.

Letter from C. Sumner Stone Jr. to Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

"Washington Afro-American" Editor Chuck Stone forwards Rev. Wyatt Walker the resumes of individuals that might be suitable to work as a public relations specialist for the SCLC. He urges that Walker and Dr. King carefully examine the resumes and respond to "the more outstanding candidates."

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

Letter to MLK from A. P. Swiderskas

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Swiderskas writes to Dr. King expressing his general hatered of the black race.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Letter from Ida Passano to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Mrs. Ida Kemp Passano sends encouraging words to Dr. King along with her contribution to his efforts.

Memorandum from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

This memo addresses fundraising events that Mr. Duckett wishes to pursue.

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.