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MLK's 36th Birthday Celebration

Monday, February 1, 1965

Friends and family celebrate with Dr. King at his 36th birthday party.

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Geneva, Switzerland, Atlanta, GA

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Wednesday, October 6, 1965
Oslo, Norway, CHINA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GREECE

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Givan to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Givan urge Dr. King to become a televised preacher, citing a lack thereof and the need for someone to combine the "social gospel" with the Christian fundamentals.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967
ISRAEL, Berlin, Germany

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 16, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY

Clarence B. Jones writes Dora McDonald to inform her of his travel plans to Los Angeles, California.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Christianity

Dr. King outlines Angus' interpretation of Hegel's views on Christianity in the book, "The Mystery Religion and Christianity."

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Letter from Miss McDonald to Rev. J. Martin England

Friday, May 5, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Rev. England that Dr.King spent a few days in the hospital. She asks for Rev. England to send the insurance forms for Dr.King to complete.

Telegram from Dr. Robert Green to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Robert L. Green, Executive Director of Friends of SNCC Los Angeles, criticizes recent remarks made by the SCLC regarding his organization. Dr. Green also advises Dr. King that the SCLC should not comment on SNCC, if the SCLC cannot say something positive.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Georgia (GA)

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Dr. Abernathy Says Full Steam Ahead in '67

Friday, January 6, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. Abernathy recaps accomplishments of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 1966. He states several objectives for the organization's efforts for 1967.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Washington, D.C.

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX)

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Little Rock, AR, Montgomery, AL, Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about Potential Publishers

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

This letter, dated 4/6/65, from Ms. Daves to Dr. King, discusses possible courses of action concerning various elements wanting to publish selections of Dr. King's work. These elements are competing and, in some cases, conflicting. Ms. Daves mentions an upcoming conference in which another matter would be discussed in addition to these.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.