The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Letter from MLK to Arthur Evans

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for Dr. Evans' contribution to the SCLC. He goes on to state the importance of the supporters contribution, so that the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

Sermon Outline

This document outlines sermon notes and ideas. Dr. King references passages from the book of Luke. He also wonders what Christ did to give people hope when their desires had not been reached. King also discusses that Jesus conquers time, where as, human beings are victims of time.

Letter from Rev. Jesse H. Williams to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Reverend Jesse H. Williams, Pastor of Saint Luke Community Christian Church, invites Dr. King to speak at his church.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
Denver, CO

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Les Seize Club, Inc. writes Dr. King expressing that her club "continues to believe in the aims of the SCLC," and encloses a monetary contribution.

Letter from Lenore Romney to Michigan State's Robert L. Green

Friday, May 19, 1967
Michigan (MI), San Francisco, CA

Mrs. Lenore Romney, wife of Michigan Governor George Romney, expresses her disappointment to Robert L. Green about his perceived misreading of a Women's City Club article in the New York Times.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

MLK Statement Regarding Housing Proposal in Chicago

Tuesday, December 20, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Robert Clifton Weaver, the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, encloses a statement made by Dr. King for Joseph Califano, assistant to President Johnson. Dr. King announces a slum area housing redevelopment project in the Chicago areas of Lawndale, East Garfield Park and Kenwood Oakland.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Wheeler B. Glenn to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Moral and Financial Support

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Wheeler B. Glenn offer his moral and financial support to Dr. King while commenting on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Professor Zeegus

Detroit, MI

Dr. King commends Professor Zeegus for his organization, Heart of Africa, and its mission to "mobilize public support for the struggle of the American Negro in efforts to help achieve freedom and equality."

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Wednesday, January 24, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

The Gibson Report

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ)

The Gibson Report illustrates the economic status of employed and unemployed African American women in the U.S. It also compared the incomes of white and black Americans.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kirkcaldy

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King responds to Lester Kirkcaldy's letter inquiring about Dr. King's availability to speak at the National Conference of Citizens Associations in Jamaica. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his previous arrangements to be in Africa and Europe during that time.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 27, 1963
London, England

H. C. Whitley invites Dr. King to the St. Giles' Lectures during Holy Week, preceding Easter of 1964. The cathedral has experienced some notable leaders and would like to continue their caliber of speakers through Dr. King's appearance.

Report of A Participant

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

Sunday, March 18, 1962
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Letter from Ernestie Newby to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL

Ms. Newby asks for assistance in improving her living situation.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.

Letter from Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Democratic Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner asks Dr. King to help with a project that will commemorate the 200th anniversary of US independence. Weltner requests that Dr. King write a letter in which he discusses the problems that democracy will face in the coming decade. Weltner also encloses a related document entitled, "A Proposal for the Formation of a Committee of Correspondence."