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Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Letter from Rev. Sandy F. Ray to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Rev. Sandy Ray (Uncle Sandy), of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, expresses deep appreciation to Dr. King for his sermon "Guidelines for a Constructive Church," delivered at the dedication of their new Center.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Call to Action in Race Relations

Sunday, January 1, 1961

J. Oscar Lee and S. Garry Oniki draft a memorandum to outline the purpose, function and program emphases for the General Committee for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

Letter from MLK to Wallace F. Bennett

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Wallace F. Bennett, a United States Senator from Utah, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Expenses for Delegates

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

Statement from MLK to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

Dr. King writes to Time Magazine regarding the President's call for "new civil rights legislation." He expresses the unfortunate lack of originality in the President's statement on the issue and stresses the importance of executive action.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Saturday, May 23, 1964

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller thanks Dr. King for sending an advance copy, with inscription, of his new book.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons for the reception and their hospitality during Dr. King's visit to Sweden.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Monday, November 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.