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Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

T. K. Mahadevan writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to an article paying homage to the late Reverend A. J. Muste.

Letter from Ms. Anne Braden to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Braden, staff member of the SCEF, writes Dr. King regarding fellow staff member, Joe Mulloy, who was planning to refuse induction into the US Army. In light of a recent SCLC member making a similar decision, Ms. Braden requests support from Dr. King.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, California (CA), Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Original Sin

Dr. King records his views regarding the doctrine of original sin.

Invitation from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This is a program for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Forty-First Boule in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event features Dr. King as a guest speaker.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

Chicago, IL

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964
New York (NY), HUNGARY

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957
Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Nationalism

Dr. King cites a biblical scripture from the book of Isaiah where it is asserted that "God's house is to be a house of prayer for all people."

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Maine (ME), Atlanta, GA

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Letter from Richard A. Russell to MLK about Integrated Housing

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Russell inquires about the Federal Housing Administration's decision on the requirements of housing integration.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, GERMANY

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK

BELIZE, HONDURAS

Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA)

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.