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Letter from William E. Duncan to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

The branch director of a Chicago based youth center welcomes Dr. King to their neighborhood. William Duncan conveys his support to Dr. King's initiatives for community revitalization. His letter was written at the beginning of a major campaign undertaken by Dr. King and SCLC to campaign for open housing in Chicago.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

The Unlimited Christ

Dr. King outlines three ways in which God is limited.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Warren Chippindale

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Dr. King writes to respond to Mr. Chippindale's invitation to have Dr. King speak in Montreal. He states that due to prior engagements, he will not be able to accept the invitation.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Letter from Elaine Hinde to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Elaine Hinde inquires about materials and information from Dr. King in regards to Choice '68.

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

John A. McDermott to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Mr. MacDermott informs Dr. King of the John F. Kennedy Award Dinner and requests that he wire his "greetings" to those who will be honoring him.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

Postcard Sent to MLK

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.