Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"GUINEA"

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

Monday, February 28, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Tuesday, March 15, 1966

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

Neighborhood Stabilization: A Program

Sunday, May 1, 1966

The Southern Regional Council issues a special report regarding neighborhood stabilization. The report investigates minority housing in majority white communities. The report states that realtors victimize Negro residents and lead white residents to believe that Negroes cause property decline. The report also features a step-by-step self-help plan for a more organized, unified and stabilized community.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Letter from Joan Daves to Senora Barquero and Senor Medina Regarding Spanish Edition

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Maria Antonia Barquero and Pedro Medina are informed that their request for a signed copy of Dr. King's book in which they translated into spanish is being forwarded to him.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Friday, November 4, 1966

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Merrill's contribution to the SCLC. He also states that he looks forward to seeing Mr. Merrill at the Morehouse College of Trustees meeting taking place the following week.

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Letter from MLK to W. Russell Chapman of the NAACP

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the York County NAACP.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

MLK's Speaker Bureau Contract

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on October 5, 1966 at the University of Rhode Island.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Recommendation Letter for Mrs. Lillie Hunter from MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Dr. King drafts a letter of recommendation for a former employee, Lillie Hunter.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King visited the city of Paris and was tremendously impressed with the people's interest or racial justice in the United States. Dr. King hopes that a meeting can take place to engage the people of Paris to further support the civil rights movement by providing financial aid to the SCLC.

Invitation from Henry Ford II

Friday, October 9, 1964

This letter from Henry Ford II is an invitation to a charitable dinner honoring General Eisenhower for receiving the Family of Man Award. The proceeds from the dinner will fund the programs of the Council which will aid families and youth.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from James C. Soutar to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

James C. Soutar expresses gratitude for Dr. King's work and requests an autographed photograph to frame along with notable teachers like Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Abraham Heschel. All of these teachers were heavy influencers of Dr. King.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Telegram from MLK to Men of Conscience

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King writes the Men of Conscience at Morehouse College to commend their "group act to find a creative alternative to the military." He assures the group that they have his prayers and support, and expresses hope that he will be able to meet with them soon.