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U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science and religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from Medora S. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Medora Bass, member of the Planned Parenthood Association in Philadelphia, invites Dr. King to speak at their annual luncheon. Bass states, "You would render a great service to the underprivileged in Philadelphia."

Citation for MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1961

This document contains the passage read on the occasion of the conferral of an honorary doctoral degree from University of Bridgeport to Dr. King.

Temporary Injunction by City of Birmingham Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

Judge W. A. Jenkins issues a temporary injunction against Wyatt Tee Walker based on the affidavits of Captain G. V. Evans and Captain George Wall. The order prohibits involvement with "mass street parades or mass processions or like demonstrations without a permit" and any other "acts calculated to cause breaches of the peace" in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

Letter from Lewis J. Stemn to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Writing from Monrovia, Liberia, Lewis J. Stemn shares his belief that one should adapt the idea to "love thy neighbor as thyself" to all facets of life.

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King writes about man, as discussed in the Old Testament passages, Hosea 10: 13 and 14.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King outlines the life and ideologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Letter from Roland Gammon to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Roland Gammon requests an interview with Dr. King for a sequel to Faith Is A Star, a book about the role faith has played in the lives of prominent Americans. The sequel will focus on world leaders.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.