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Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.

Letter from Eleanor Hicks Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

Ms. Hicks informs Dr. King of land available for sale in Randolph County, Alabama. Ms. Hicks and her family desire to keep the land's ownership and rehabilitate it for families to live.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Free Southern Theater Requests MLK's Financial Assistance

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

John O'Neal, Executive Director of the Free Southern Theater in New Orleans, requests financial assistance from Dr. King and the SCLC. Mr. O'Neal oversees a professional touring ensemble that performs in six states in the Deep South and a pilot project for a community theater program.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Letter from Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. reminds Dr. King that he has written him last November for information for a term paper.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Letter of Gratitude from MLK to Mrs. Erber

This letter of gratitude was written to Mrs. Erber from Dr. King. In this letter Dr. King thanks Mrs. Erber for forwarding the newspaper clippings about her daughter Elena. Little Elena is a supporter against the injustices of racism. Dr. King thanks her for raising such an admirable daughter.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from MLK to Edwin C. Berry

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Dr. King thanks Edwin Berry of the Council of Coordinating Organizations for presenting the Rosa Parks Award to Al Raby at the annual SCLC convention.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.