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Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Mission to Mississippi

California (CA), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Herbert Coulton Appointed Director of Affiliates of SCLC

Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Mr. Herbert Coulton is appointed the Director of Affiliates for the SCLC.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
SENEGAL, GAMBIA, PORTUGAL

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

London, England, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Robert Maloney

Monday, March 4, 1963
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Maloney encloses a picture to Dr. King that he took of a young Virginia Boy Scout troop. Maloney was surprised that all the boys in the troop were African American.

Letter from Wilma Hopkins to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Hopkins sends prayers and Bible scriptures to Dr. King to emotionally support him during his jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, London, England, SPAIN

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

My Jewish Brother

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King responds to a recent anti-Semitic remark made by a fellow civil rights leader. He discusses the need for Hebrew prophets to revitalize the moral conscious of society. "Let justice roll down like the waters of righteousness as a might stream."

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Cincinnati, OH, North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Postcard from Ollie Wilson to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ollie Wilson expresses his opinion regarding war and evolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Andree Dwan Gipson to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
Milwaukee, WI

Andree Gipson, Director of the Human Rights Committee of the University Student Government, proposes a reception for Dr. King during his visit to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Gipson also sends Dr. King a copy of the student newspaper, POST, that announces the date of Dr. King's speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to D. Martin Fischer about American People

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
GERMANY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King thanks Prof. Fischer for "submitting [his] thoughts and words of warning for the American People." Dr. King agrees with the professor's assertion that we should all try to "avoid the excesses and horrors of war."

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

Letter from George Fedak to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

George Fedak writes Mrs. King to express his sympathy for Dr. King's death.