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MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Cosomological Argument for God

Dr. King references the cosmological argument for God.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Cornell Talley to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Cornell Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, writes Dr. King as a reminder of his interest in the Reverend's cause and inquires about the SCLC's fundraising efforts.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Lotte Kallos to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

Lotte Kallos writes Dr. King on behalf of the Student Union of Lund University in Sweden, inviting him to speak after receiving word of his upcoming visit to Europe.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Treasury Spells Out Equal Employment Requirements for Banks

Friday, February 17, 1967

This press release details the requirements for compliance with the Treasury Department's Equal Employment regulations.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. David Vetten

Thursday, April 4, 1968

The recipient of this letter is unknown, however, the Vetten family issued condolences for the murder of Dr. King. The Vettens acknowledged that Dr. Kng was a "hero of our nation."

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Letter from Clyde De L. Ryals to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Clyde De L. Ryals shares the perspective of his white counterparts in Georgia in congratulating Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Letter from Peter White to Dora McDonald Regarding MLK Invitation

Monday, August 23, 1965

Peter White, President of the University of Western Ontario Student Council, sends Dora McDonald an invitation for Dr. King to come speak at their institution. He explains that another institution is planning to invite Dr. King to their facility and it would be financially "attractive" and convenient for Dr. King to accept both invitations.