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Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Letter from MLK to Carey B. Preston

Thursday, September 3, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority for making his visit to their convention enjoyable and for also contributing $1500.00 to the SCLC.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

United Auto Workers Convention Speech

Monday, May 1, 1961

Dr. King delivered this speech at the 1961 United Automobile Workers convention. He highlights the changes that have taken place in organized labor. He also connects the organized labor movement to equal opportunity in housing and the political process.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Event Program for Chester Robinson Tribute

Speaking invitation to Dr. King for a tribute to Chester Robinson and the West Side Organization at the First Congregational Church in Chicago.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Randolph Compton - February 22, 1968

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Dr. King thanks Randolph Compton for his one thousand dollar donation to the SCLC. He also acknowledges that this contribution assists in the work of voter registration and securing decent jobs and decent housing for the poor.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Telegram from the Bailey Family to Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

The Bailey family welcomes Dr. King home.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."

Chapter 1 - Introduction

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.