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"Georgia (GA)"

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Letter of Gratitude to Dr. King from Willa Clark, Prince Hall Grand Chapter

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Willa Clark, Grand Worthy Matron of the Prince Hall Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, wrote to Dr. King expressing a debt of appreciation for his high civic service rendered to mankind. Putting action to sentiment, the Order of the Eastern Star encloses a $500.00 donation to aid in continuing the work toward dignity and freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Book Cover Notes

These remarks about Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" were prepared for the cover of his book and offer a very helpful overview of the early days of Dr. King's work.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from Susan Drubin to SCLC

Ms. Drubin desires to make a monetary contribution to the SCLC to continue the work of Dr. King. As such, she writes to obtain more information about the procedures for contributing a percentage of her annual salary. She finalizes her letter by noting that she is taking a speech course in which she hopes to use the information sent to her to draft a speech.

Letter from MLK to Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King writes Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya in response to a letter that requested prayer for their first born child, Chiraashree. Dr. King expresses his appreciation for their sentiments regarding his work and informs Bhattacharya that their child will forever be in his prayers.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

James Meredith Article

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from Murillo Millin to SCLC

Friday, April 20, 1962

Murillo Millin, President of the Van Buren Block Association, Inc., makes a contribution to the SCLC.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Statement by Linda Dannenbreg

In this statement, Linda Danneberg protests the war in Vietnam by discussing the formation of the Student Mobilization Committee. She also expounds on the organization's upcoming national conference in Chicago, Illinois.