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"Georgia (GA)"

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Letter from Edna Smith to Ralph Helstein

Thursday, January 26, 1967

In this letter, Edna Smith writes to Mr. Helstein regarding Dorothy Ashford's participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Ashford is a student at Clemson University, who previously worked with the South Carolina Council on Human Relations.

Letter from Leslie Orear to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Leslie Orear requests Dr. King's assistance with judging the eight candidates for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Telegram from Walter T. Dixon to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Walter T. Dixon, a City Councilman from Baltimore, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

Suffering

Dr. King questions whether the statement in Proverbs 11:23 that the righteous are rewarded with goodness and the wicked wrath is always true.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

The Christian Sense of Individuality

Dr. King quotes from "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" by Reinhold Niebuhr, on the Christian sense of individuality.