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Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Dignitaries Attending the Spring Moblization

Presented here is a list of political and social leaders attending a mobilization held in the spring.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Letter from MLK to Linda Houser

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes this letter to Linda Houser of Ursulin Academy regarding the studies that cultivated her involvement in the "struggle for social justice in America."

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Pledge for Peace Campaign

Mr. Karno and Mr. Saunders request assistance for their Pledge for Peace campaign. This campaign specifically targets the economy through the automotive industry. "I hereby pledge not to buy a new car until there is peace in Vietnam".

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Telegram from Muhammed Speaks Newspaper to MLK, Sr.

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Muhammed Speaks Newspaper contacts Martin Luther King, Sr. to confirm the presentation of a portrait of Dr. King, which is a gift of Muhammad Ali.

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Letter from Rosslyn J. Shaw to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Rosslyn J. Shaw invites Dr. King to speak to the New Zealand Universities Students' Association's annual Congress.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Statement from Jack Wood Jr. to the National Association of Housing Cooperatives

Saturday, March 19, 1966

Wood commends President Johnson for his call for a Fair Housing Act and the Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 that would provide funds for rehabilitation of urban ghettoes. However, he laments the fact that they are separate bills and the government is accepting applications for the Demonstration Cities program absent a Fair Housing Act.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.