Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Greenwood, MS"

SCLC Warns of Disaster in Mississippi

The SCLC issues a statement regarding a fire that destroyed their office at the Bell Flower Baptist Church in Grenada, Mississippi. The SCLC set up a new office in Grenada to continue programs including school integration, voter registration, and development of community leadership.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Crozer Theological Seminary: The Bulletin

Saturday, July 1, 1950

The Bulletin, a newsletter sent to Dr. King from the Crozer Theological Seminary, includes information on the 1950 commencement. This is this institution from which Dr. King himself will graduate from in 1951.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Letter from Charles L. Allen Sr. to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968

After listening to an address by Dr. King, Charles L. Allen, Sr. extends his support and requests information on where to send a financial contribution.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

Monday, January 16, 1961

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King for afternoon tea to discuss ongoing issues in Deerfield, Illinois with Rev. Bletzer and members of the American Freedom of Residence Fund.

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.