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Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Wednesday, July 27, 1966
Washington (WA)

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

New Housing Developments - West

Ohio (OH)

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Nite of Civil Rights

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program details events that occurred for a "Nite of Civil Rights."

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Letter from Dr. S. M. Sophocles to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. S. M. Sophocles invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights at a cultural program for Pennsylvania Military College.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965
NORTH KOREA, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GERMANY

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962
Albany, GA

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Denver, CO

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Letter from Thomas Bradley to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

Thomas Bradley, Los Angeles' Tenth District Councilman, requests Dr. King's support with a fundraising campaign.

Letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

This letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to Dr. King request Dr. King send and autograph for the St. John's Military Academy autograph collection.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
Oslo, Norway, VIETNAM

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY)

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Action Among Nations: International Planned Parenthood Federation

INDIA, TAIWAN, HONG KONG, BARBADOS

This publication highlights collaborative efforts to support and expand the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The document highlights statistical data demonstrating the organization's successes in "voluntary fertility control," and references Planned Parenthood's conference scheduled in autumn 1966.

Telegram from NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

The NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action sends Dr. King well wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, April 24, 1964
New York, NY, GERMANY

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the German publishing house's request for a personalized forward for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from the Lamar W. Sessoms Family to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, the Sessoms family informs Dr. King that rural sections of Mississippi are systematically starving their Negro residents. The Sessoms family asks for Dr. King's advice and assistance in alleviating this problem.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965
CANADA

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York (NY), Chicago, IL

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), INDIA

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
New York, NY

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."