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Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

Sermon Notes: Christianity Explored

Dr. King discusses the various concepts of the religious body of Christianity. He specifically highlights the Christian perspective in relation to life, the Kingdom of God on Earth, and Jesus Christ.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Svend Eril Stybe

Friday, February 7, 1964
DENMARK

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark at the request of the Student Association. He graciously turns down the invitation stating that he has made the "firm decision" to spend more time in the American South in order to focus on civil rights work.

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Friday, August 4, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI), San Francisco, CA, Berkeley, CA, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Cambridge, MA, Wisconsin (WI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
JAPAN, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

South Carolina (SC)

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from David Pope to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966
AUSTRALIA

David Pope extends an invitation for Dr. King to come to Australia. Pope continues to state his solidarity for the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and speaks to the international commonalities of social justice issues.

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964
New York (NY), JAPAN

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Letter from Joseph P. Robinson to MLK

Friday, July 28, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Reverend Joseph P. Robinson invites Dr. King to contribute to Robinson's book of sermons titled, "Pulpit Evangelism."

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

God

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Newsletter Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Florida (FL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter serves as an informational letter on the efforts of Operation Breadbasket. According to the letter, this organization, has provided over 900 jobs for Negroes, opened up services for Negro businessmen and offered other types of assistance.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
HUNGARY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), DENMARK, Connecticut (CT), Tallahassee, FL, Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Brooklyn, NY, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.