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Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
New York, NY

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Letter from Dorothy Dunbar Bromley to Andrew Young

Monday, April 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Bromley informs Reverend Andrew Young that she would like to write Dr. King's biography.

Letter from David R. Echeldfer to MLK

New York (NY)

David Echeldfer sends a copy of the Time Magazine with Dr. King on the cover and requests his autograph, and for King to return the magazine by mail.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

Letter from Henry R. Luce to MLK

Thursday, January 30, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Henry R. Luce expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's letter that will be placed in his personal archives as a "highly treasured memory."


Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
California (CA), Ohio (OH)

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963
Texas (TX)

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Letter from Laurence Kirkpatrick to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The World Convention of Churches of Christ is requesting a photo and biography of Dr. King to use for publicity purposes at their Seventh Assembly where Dr. King will be in attendance.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bent Ostergaard

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Miss McDonald informs Mr. Ostergaard that Dr. King is unable to accept his recent invitation to visit Copenhagen.

Note to Dr. King from JOAN DAVES, New York, NY, dated September 23, 1973

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with Oncken for german language edition of Stride Toward Freedom.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions


In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.


Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

MLK Itinerary

Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Hilborn, President of the Empire Club of Canada, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at one of their weekly Thursday luncheons. Hilborn lists previous speakers that have presented before the Club and he hopes Dr. King will be added to that list.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.