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God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.

Article regarding MLK

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Telegram from MLK to Family of Marshall Shepherd

Friday, February 24, 1967

Dr. King offers condolences and encouragement to the bereaved family of Marshall Shepherd, a Minister at Mt. Olivet Tabernacle Church in Philadelphia. Due to a previous commitment, Dr. King will be unable to attend the funeral.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter to SCLC from Preston Warren

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Bucknell University Department of Philosophy Chairman Preston Warren, a supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, reduces his usual $5 contribution to $1 because of his disagreements with Dr. King's stance against the war in Vietnam.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Letter from Mr. Stephen Benedict to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

In this letter Mr. Benedict is writing on behalf of Mrs. Ann R. Pierson to notify Dr. King of her contribution to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy from Abraham Grinoch

Monday, April 22, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy received this letter addressing the issuance of war bonds to meet financial requirements during war emergencies. Grinoch proposes that the country issue "War on Poverty Bonds", to provide the funds necessary for eradicating poverty in the United States.

Get Well Message to MLK from the Anderson Family

The Anderson family wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery and informs him of a recent meeting with Rev. Kelley.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Memorandum from John Gunther to Urban Coalition Steering Committee

Monday, December 11, 1967

John Gunther submits a report to the members of the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition stating that the Urban Coalition should be concerned with issues related to education, employment and housing. The memorandum outlines the job of the Council of Local Coalitions and states that the Steering Committee may add to the Coalition's numbers at any time. Lastly, Gunther informs the members of the staffing polices explaining how staffing will be planned on a yearly basis.

Hunger U.S.A.

This pamphlet outlines the necessity for intervention programs, like the National Council of Negro Women's pilot program, to combat the issue of malnutrition within the African American community.

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Letter from Pastor Sutton-Branch to SCLC

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Pastor Sutton-Branch, of the Commonwealth Community Church in Chicago, sends condolences and donations to the SCLC, while urging the recipient to extend sympathy to Mrs. King, for the loss of her husband.

Letter from Wheeler B. Glenn to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Moral and Financial Support

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Wheeler B. Glenn offer his moral and financial support to Dr. King while commenting on the war in Vietnam.

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".