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Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Crozer Theological Seminary Brochure

This brochure provides information about Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. The brochure lists full details of the campus, programs of study, and admissions.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

Thursday, July 29, 1965

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Request Letter from Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gesellschaft

Saturday, December 30, 1967

In this Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gessellschaft is requesting that Dr. King contribute to an International Fairy-Tale and Fable-book. The book is a charitbale action to benifit UNICEF.

God

Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter to Mrs. King from Katherine Hardy

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

Katherine Hardy, a mother of five, faces eviction and desperately writes to Mrs. King for any aid she can provide.

Letter to the Editor regarding Harris Wofford

This letter to the editor comes to the defense of Harris Wofford, civil rights advisor to President Kennedy, who was inaccurately described in print.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Monday, January 23, 1967

R. W. Boone sends this Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Routing Slip to Dr. King. The slip lists the name "Andy," which could be in reference to King's associate Andrew Young.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Marian S. Dockhorn

Friday, April 24, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Marian S. Deckhorn's letter concerning the invitation extended to him and Coretta Scott King for the Bucks Count World Peace Fair. Dr. King notifies Mrs. Deckhorn that they will be unable to attend on the suggested date due to his international travel to Berlin.

Voting in Negro Majority Counties

This document contains percentages of registered Negro voters and registered white voters in Negro majority counties in the Southern United States.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

MLK at a Communist Training School

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.