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"HAITI"

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Thursday, December 2, 1965
New York (NY), Tennessee (TN)

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

1922 Work

Dr. King identifies different philosophical points of Alfred North Whitehead's 1922 publication, titled "The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science."

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
CANADA, Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, New York (NY)

The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Emancipation Proclamation Dinner Program

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King speaks at a dinner engagement honoring the centennial anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

California (CA)

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

Telegram from Donna Jean Stancliff to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Atlanta, GA

Donna Jean Stancliff informs Dr. King of Mrs. Zelma G. Proctor's funeral.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

MLK Writes Rev. Frank N. Williams Thanking Him for Support

Thursday, October 11, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King writes Rev. Williams and expresses his appreciation for his witness in Albany, Ga. He also apologizes for the time delay of the letter explaining that there was an accumulation of mail in his office. He goes on to say that the work that Rev. Williams has done was very important and will continue to be needed in the movement.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Statements of Wisdom"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing boxes in reference to a statement of Wisdom by Charles G. Finney.

Letter from M. I. [MS illegible] to MLK about Civil Rights

In this letter the writer asks Dr. King to continue the quest for civil rights and comments on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Tuesday, January 16, 1962
Michigan (MI)

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Messages From Dora McDonald to Dr. King

Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, London, England, Atlanta, GA

Notes from Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, detailing phone messages from key movement stakeholders and colleagues.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Materialism

Dr. King quotes Hugh Elliott’s “Modern Science and Materialism.”

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Challenge to New Age - Importance of Voting

In this challenge to the public, the author lists a number of reasons supporting the importance of voting in the black community, then concludes with a call to join the ranks of the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

Letter from Nancy Atkinson of Time Magazine to MLK

Wednesday, April 29, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Nancy Atkinson sends Dr. King a duplicate of the Time Magazine cover honoring him as the Man of the Year for 1963. He is informed that the cover will be a part of a traveling exhibit of other Time covers.

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, KENYA, SWEDEN

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.

Letter from Mark Baldwin to MLK about an Interview

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mark Baldwin, managing editor of the "Washingtonian" magazine, requests an interview with Dr. King to be conducted by Tom Donnelly.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.