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"HAITI"

Letter from MLK to S. Dillon Ripley at the Smithsonian Institute

Friday, May 21, 1965

Dr. King informs S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, that he is unable to attend the bicentennial celebration of the birth of James Smithson.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Permission to Include King's New York Times Article in College Textbook

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Phillip O. Foss, Chairman of the Political Science Department of Colorado State University, seeks Dr. King's permission to include his article "Civil Right No. 1 - The Right to Vote" in a college textbook. Foss is preparing the textbook "Major Issues of Our Time", to be published by Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Letter from L. John Collins to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

John Collins writes to Dr. King to inform him of the record release of Nelson Mandela's speech with its enclosure. Collins continues with reference to the Reverend's visit in Norway, adding a request to mention Mandela's record during this time. In closing, the author reminds Dr. King of a discussion earlier in the year in reference to a trip to Europe, then alternatively requests his itinerary.

Letter from David J. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

David Walker, Chairman of the Speakers Committee for Toronto Junior Board of Trade writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at their Tuesday night dinner meeting. Walker continues with his own personal adulation on the Reverend receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from William F. Grant to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

After being insulted by a solicitation from the SCLC, William Grant lectures Dr. King on the morality of his methods and strongly disfavors the work of several civil rights groups and the civil rights struggle as a whole.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

We Would See Jesus

Dr. King summarizes a biblical passage from the Book of John, in which he describes "inquiring Greeks" from a rich heritage who came to Philip and made the simple request, "sir, we would see Jesus." These words are also the title of one of Dr. King's sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.