Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"HAITI"

Dr. King's Schedule October 1967

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements, October 1967.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

Kingdom of God

Dr. King notes the origin of the ideology of God having sovereign rule over the universe.

Letter from Ronald V. Wells to Crozer Theological Seminary Alumnus

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Ronald V. Wells, President of Crozer Theological Seminary sends an invitation to the alumni of Crozer Theological Seminary, requesting their presence at the annual Centennial Celebration. Enclosed with the letter is a list of several conveniently located hotels in the area as well as a voting sheet.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Saturday, April 27, 1963

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Letter from Stephen Johnston to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Stephen Johnston, of the Communications Department at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C, forwards Dr. King a copy of the press release promoting his upcoming appearance. It was on this date that Dr. King delivered his second to last speech, "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Religion

Dr. King comments on Plato's view of religion and records a quote from A.G. Keller's "Science and Society."

Letter from Phale D. Hale to MLK

Saturday, December 7, 1963

Phale D. Hale, Pastor of Union Grove Baptist Church, sends $100.00 in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Pastor Hale praises Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and offers to organize a massive fund-raising event in Columbus, Ohio if Dr. King will attend.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.