Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)"

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Miss Susan Frehse to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1960

Miss Frehse expresses her feelings about Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom,"and how it was hard to convince her classmates of the degree to which the white people in Alabama went to rob Negroes of their rights. She also asks Dr. King to send any available information that will help her classmates understand the reality of racism in the South.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

Eternal Objects

Dr. King cites Alfred North Whitehead's book "Science and the Modern World."

Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children announces a program that will bring war-maimed children from Vietnam to the United Stares for medical treatment.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Letter from Arvella Gray to MLK

Arvella Gray sends Dr. King some records for the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church to sing along with some of their pictures.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, February 5, 1964

Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King hoping to have lunch with his family at Pocantico Hills. His intent is to raise funds for the Urban League of Westchester County and the SCLC.

Telegram to MLK from the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Saturday, October 31, 1964

A coalition of Swedish dignitaries send their congratulations to Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and extend and invitation for Dr. King to visit Sweden either before or after his trip to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966

Ira Sandperl writes on what he believes should be the direction of SCLC. It is stressed that SCLC should engage in a universal nonviolent human rights movement.

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Support Letter to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

The author of this letter is sending Dr. King a book entitiled 'Satyagraha in South Africa' by Mahatma Gandhi. The book holds similarities to Dr. King's book 'Stride Towards Freedom'. The author of the letter describes how both books have provided inspiration to those who believe in the philosophy of non-violence.

Recommendation from Laplois Ashford

Friday, March 17, 1967

The Executive Director of the Urban League of Rochester writes this letter of recommendation to the President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers on behalf of Bernice Turner.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Letter from MLK to Hermine Popper

This letter from Dr. King to editor Hermine Popper references a book that Dr. King is working on. Enclosed is the chapter about "The Dilemma of White America."