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"HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)"

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the final payment for an excerpt from Life Magazine, titled "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Letter from James E. Bristol to Coretta Scott King

Monday, August 5, 1957
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Bristol responds to a previous invitation to attend the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention. He informs Mrs. King of his inability to attend due to a prior engagement but trusts that the convention will make a significant impact.

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, JAPAN

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from MLK to Arthur Hamman

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mr. Hamman for his previous letter in support of Dr. King and his work .

Letter from MLK to Clarence E. Pickett

Monday, October 14, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Pickett of American Friends Service Committee, he has accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements allowable for the next year or longer.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966
South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Letter from Annie Mae Williams to MLK

Sunday, May 2, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Annie Mae Williams and her family make a contribution of $25 to Dr. King.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about VISTA Director

Thursday, September 15, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes President Johnson recommending that Dr. Maurice Dawkins become the new director of VISTA.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
VIETNAM, New York, NY

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Boston, MA

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967
London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to join the World Conference on Vietnam in Stockholm. The conference will include delegates from multiple peace organizations around the world to help protest the war in Vietnam.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966
New Hampshire (NH), Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Proposals

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Letter from Alfred T. Davies to Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, May 26, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Alfred T. Davies writes Mrs. King thanking her for her performance before the General Assembly. Davies also sends well wishes and support to Dr. and Mrs. King in their endeavors.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Letter to MLK from John Yeck

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Yeck asks Dr. King to think about the connotations of the words "black" and "Negro." He feels that the word "black" contains a separating connotation, and the word "Negro" a unifying one.