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"HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)"

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

Letter from Lewis J. Stemn to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Writing from Monrovia, Liberia, Lewis J. Stemn shares his belief that one should adapt the idea to "love thy neighbor as thyself" to all facets of life.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

Request for Land Reform Bill

An anonymous writer asks Dr. King to petition Congress for a reform bill that would allow all people, irrespective of race, creed or societal status, to own land.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

Welcome to Kennett Square, Dr. King

Thursday, September 15, 1966

The highlighted article of this newspaper clipping reports on Dr. King's upcoming visit to Kennett High School in Chester County, Pennsylvania at the invitation of the Hadley Memorial Fund program committee. The editorial addresses dissenters who object to Dr. King's visit to Kennett Square for various reasons, including perceived threats of civil disobedience and because Dr. King "fails to measure up as cultural material." However, the author insists that Dr.

Letter from T. M. Benson to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

A representative from Peak Publications requests Dr. King's permission to use a portion of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract concerning racial issues and the church. The sender offers a hundred dollars for permission to reprint this section.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Joan Daves contacts Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding the payment from the Canadian Broadcasting series in the amount of $5,000. Daves further discusses the galley of lectures that are to be checked and released by Dr. King for publication in Canada. In addition to Dr. King, Stanley Levison will also be reviewing the galleys.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

Thursday, June 8, 1967

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from C. Ray Ballard to MLK Regarding Adam Clayton Powell

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Ballard expresses disappointment to hear a recent radio report of Dr. King's political support for Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Ballard defines this as a missed opportunity to promote racial justice.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

Monday, September 5, 1966

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Letter from Mary Welcome to MLK

Miss Welcome praises the work that Dr. King has done for civil rights. She also offers him her prayers and promises to send money to aid the cause when she is able to afford it.

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes William James' essay "Is Life Worth Living?"

Invitation from University Religious Association

Friday, April 1, 1966

The University Religious Association sends Dr. King an invitation to be a guest speaker at the University of Florida.

Telegram from R.C. Bell to Ivan Allen

Monday, March 25, 1963

In this telegram to Mayor Allen of Atlanta, Dr. Bell protests the Dental Society. The Dental Society is scheduled to meet at the Municipal Auditorium on a segregated basis. Dr. Bell reminds Mayor Allen that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled such segregation illegal.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."