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"HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)"

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to John Lewis of SNCC

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Ralph D. Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary-Treasurer of the SCLC, sends a check as a gift to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC. Abernathy also informs Lewis of the SCLC's financial situation, which prevents the organization from making a loan to SNCC.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United States...is love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Telegram from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

The registrar at Newcastle University thanks Dora McDonald for communicating Dr. King's additional engagement commitments to help in their planning.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

List of Negro Inventors

This list of Negro American inventors includes various individuals such as Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful open heart surgery, and W.A. Lavalette, who invented the printing press.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.