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"HONDURAS"

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Letter from Lucille D. Anderson to MLK inviting him to Philadelphia

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King's presence is requested by Lucille Anderson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

Letter from Alice Houghton Sherill to MLK

On behalf of the Detroit Women for Dr. Martin Luther King, Alice Houghton Sherrill thanks Dr. King for the envelopes received from his secretary. Mrs. Sherrill extends her welcome to Dr. King for his upcoming visit to Detroit and offers the group's assistance during his stay.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.