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"HONDURAS"

Supererogation

Dr. King defines supererogation.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays encourages the institution's board of trustee members to participate in the Centennial Convocation platform party. President Mays also encloses a calendar of events for the College's 100th Anniversary week.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King

Richard Daley is requesting Dr. King's presence at the Mayor's office to discuss ways of improving the education, employment, health, and living conditions to help the youth in the city of Chicago. Department Heads will be present at the meeting to answer questions and discuss recommendations that aid the city in achieving their goals.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Earl M. Smith, on behalf of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, requests permission from Dr. King to translate and publish a Portuguese edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

NCNP Role in the South, 1968, with Proposed Budget

Hosea Williams writes Mr. Pepper persuading him to have a program for the National Conference on New Politics in the South. He feels the programs would help many of the states in the South come together through a south-wide congress. Mr. Williams then includes the targeted states and cities as well as the financial aspects to make sure this program is a success.

Telegram from Arrowsmith to MLK

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Arrowsmith issues a telegram inquiring about Dr. King's potential visit to the country of Australia.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Letter from MLK to Carey B. Preston

Thursday, September 3, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority for making his visit to their convention enjoyable and for also contributing $1500.00 to the SCLC.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. H. L. Wynter

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Mr. H. L. Wynter that Dr. King will be able to attend his baccalaureate service for the University of the West Indies.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter to Margaret C. Fowler from MLK about Governor Nelson Rockefeller

Thursday, September 9, 1965

In this letter to New York Calendar Secretary Margaret Fowler, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Governor Rockefeller's willingness to speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Men's Day Observance. Dr. King then describes the schedule of events for Rockefeller's visit.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Johnnie Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones requests that Dr. King send $54.00 to his home to help with his bills. Mr. Jones also requests that Dr. King consider him for painting services.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Friday, June 4, 1965

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.