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Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Daniel Gallagher to MLK

Wednesday, May 23, 1962

Daniel Gallagher, manager of Textile Workers Union of America, encloses a check in the amount of $10.00 as a contribution to the SCLC.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Harry C. Meserve to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Mr. Meserve of the Michigan Human Relation Council thanks Dr. King for his address to the organization. Additionally he apologizes for the disturbance of the "Nazis" during his visit.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Letter from MLK to the United Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. Edward Williams for the support of the United Presbyterian Church Commission on Religion and Race. He encloses a receipt for $5000 for partial payment of a grant for the salary of Hosea Williams. Williams was National Program Director for SCLC from 1967 to 1969 and was arrested more than 125 times for his civil rights activism.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

NAACP Remembers MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The NAACP released this comprehensive tribute in Dr. King's memory. The tribute was printed in The New York Post on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.