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Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Materialism

Dr. King records a definition of materialism.

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Letter from the Mississippi Club to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS)

Officials of the Mississippi Club make a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and offer a prayer for Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

Thursday, December 19, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from MLK to Geraldine Fothergill

Monday, February 25, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King informs Mrs. Fothergill that her idea to house African American students through a coordinated church effort has merit. He suggests that she contact Reverend Richard Battles of the Mount Olives Baptist Church in Hartford, Connecticut, who is a representative of the SCLC and gauge his reaction to the idea.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

Discrimination in Operations of Interstate Motor Carriers of Passenger

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
Washington, D.C.

Harold McCoy, Secretary of the United States Interstate Commerce Commission, proposes that passenger tickets should include a non-discrimination notice.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

News Article "Who Creates Slums?"

J. Frank Lindsey reports Mr. Hilliard's views about how slums are created. The reasons cited by Mr. Hilliard include undisciplined children and landlords who don't take care of their property.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967
California (CA)

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.