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MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Filing System for Illustrations

Dr. King writes notes to assist in organizing a filing system for illustrations.

God (His Infinity)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the finite and infinite.

Index Card with Dr.King's Handwritten Philosophy Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines insights on pantheism and references philosophers Goethe, Spinoza, and Rousseau. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, October 20, 1963

Milton A. Reid, candidate for the Eighth Senatorial District, invites Mahalia Jackson to come and sing at the oldest Negro Baptist Church in America.

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

The Montgomery Improvement Association

Dr. King expresses gratitude for his receipt of a kind letter and informs the recipient that their words of sympathy have endorsed great moral support.

Terror in Louisiana

The article describes the terrorist actions occurring within the area of north Louisiana. An African American dentist by the name of C.O. Simpkins was one of the victims targeted due to his activism in Civil Rights. Due to Simpkins large presence within the movement, his house was bombed and burned down. This is just one example of the constant hatred and violence many African Americans had to go through to gain equality within the South.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The writer informs Dr. King that he or she is repulsed with Dr. King and laments the day that "your people get to rule this country."

Letter from Margarita Rubio to MLK Regarding Employment

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Margarita Rubio is in request of employment and seeks Dr. King for assistance. As a result of the leadership of Fidel Castro, Mrs. Rubio has relocated to the United States due to the political turmoil in Cuba. She has a bachelors degree in pedagogy but desires to teach Spanish at a college or university. Furthermore, Mrs. Rubio encloses a picture to accompany her letter to Dr. King.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from MLK to Michael Joesph Mansfield

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Mansfield for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Notes - Dr. King's Rough Draft of a Response to Mr. Walter Harding

This document is a rough draft of Dr. King's thank-you letter to Mr. Harding for a book he dedicated in part to Dr. King.

Letter from Roger Bobley to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Roger Bobley, Revision Editor for the Illustrated World Encyclopedia, writes Dr. King asking him to submit a report on the "goals, importance and achievements of the Civil Rights movement in America."

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.