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Letter from Robert M. Hatch to MLK

Friday, April 9, 1965

Rev. Hatch of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts responds to Dr. King's request for "financial assistance" on behalf of SCLC. Rev. Hatch cheerfully tells Dr. King that the Diocesan Council has agreed to answer the request favorably, and he references an enclosed check for two thousand dollars.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

Friday, April 29, 1966

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

SCLC Mail Log: January 29, 1968

Monday, January 29, 1968

This document contains a record of received mail for several members of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Religious Experience

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and G. K. Chesterton on the need for trying the Christian experiment to have the Christian experience.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Joanne Baker

In this letter, Dr. King offers his instructions and a statement pertaining to the history of the "Negro Revolution of the 1960's," including a statement on the Watts and Harlem riots.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Art - Aesthetic

Dr. King notes several passages from Paul Tillich's "The Religious Situation." The quotes relay the importance of art and its aesthetic value on the function of spiritual situations.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Telegram from the Montgomery Improvement Association to Leaders of Birmingham

Thursday, May 9, 1963

The Montgomery Improvement Association office staff sends Dr. King, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Abernathy and other Birmingham civil rights leaders words of encouragement.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

Draft Telegram from MLK to Federation of Teachers

In this draft telegram, Dr. King addresses the Federation of Teachers enthusiastically endorsing the efforts of New York City teachers to improve their living and working conditions. Dr. King urges the teachers and parents to dispel conflict as they face a contentious Board of Education. Dr. King makes a key point informing parents that it is not the teachers "withholding education but those who have forced them to resort to desperate measures."

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.