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MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Columbus, OH, Cleveland, OH

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Progressive National Baptist Convention Sixth Annual Session

Monday, July 31, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, South Africa, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This news release outlines the events and participants for the Sixth Annual Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio. The theme of the conference is Spiritual Renewal in a Decaying Society.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

Thank You Note from Atlanta Braves' President to MLK and Coretta Scott King

Friday, October 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA

William C. Bartholomay, chairman and president of the Atlanta Braves, thanks Mr. and Mrs. King for sending him a recording of the "March on Washington."

Social Gospel

Dr. King describes the period of the social gospel.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

Washington, D.C.

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Honolulu, HI, Texas (TX), London, England, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962
New York, NY, Albany, GA

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

VIETNAM

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
New York (NY)

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

New York (NY), SOUTH AFRICA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, NETHERLANDS, SWEDEN, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Arkansas (AR)

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965
Georgia (GA)

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
Memphis, TN, California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Notecard regarding "The Theology of the Old Testament"

On this notecard, Dr. King references A.B. Davidson's book "The Theology of the Old Testament". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Letter from The Bulstrode School Children to MLK

London, England, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

The Bulstrode school children write Dr. King concerning their initiative to fundraise for the Negro children in Mississippi and Alabama. They expressed to Dr. King how they decided to sell daffodils that were grown from their own gardens.

Telegram from Prentiss Childs to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C.

Prentiss Childs, producer of the CBS news program "Face the Nation," invites Rev. Abernathy to speak on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
California (CA)

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.