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"Hatfield, Mark O"

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Draft Telegram from MLK to Federation of Teachers

In this draft telegram, Dr. King addresses the Federation of Teachers enthusiastically endorsing the efforts of New York City teachers to improve their living and working conditions. Dr. King urges the teachers and parents to dispel conflict as they face a contentious Board of Education. Dr. King makes a key point informing parents that it is not the teachers "withholding education but those who have forced them to resort to desperate measures."

Letter from John H. Britton, Jr. to MLK about a Photograph

Monday, December 21, 1964

In this letter John H. Britton, Jr., managing editor of JET, encloses a copy of a photograph of Dr. King reading a novel, "The Prize," in a hospital bed. The photograph was sent to Dr. King after the author of the novel, Irving Wallace, also requested a copy.

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from Warren Hamilton to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Warren Hamilton, president of the Student Government Association of the Tuskegee Institute, invites Dr. King to participate in their upcoming lecture series entitled "Viewpoint '68."

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

Letter from Robert Johnson to MLK

The author requests Dr. King to encourage black people to put away their wickedness so the Lord can take care of them.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.

Definitions

Dr. King defines a set of words such as, "Gospel" and "Justification."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Credit

Saturday, September 1, 1962

This poem examines a man's earthly worth and finally his heavenly worth.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.