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"Hatfield, Mark O"

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

Royalty Statement-MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King receives a royalty statement for the sale of the Norwegian edition of "Stength to Love." The Norwegian edition was published by De Unge Forlag and sold 6963 copies. The total for the statement amounts to $1139.15.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Letter from Ernest Marshall Howse to MLK

Friday, January 10, 1964

Rev. Howse invites Dr. King to preach at the Craddock Student Mission in Toronto during Dr. King's planned trip to the area.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Letter from Professor A. Clement to MLK Regarding the Peace Movement

Monday, May 15, 1967

A. Clement, Professor of Foreign Languages at Los Angeles City College, drafted this letter to Dr. King supporting his peace efforts against the Vietnam War. Enclosing 100 dollars, Clement further suggests that King reaches out to churches and synagogues across America to collect a special offering for the cause.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Monday, October 4, 1965

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Jeremiah

Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

The Church

Dr. King writes a note on the Church, calling it the "center of hope."

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.