Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Hatfield, Mark O"

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

God (His Love)

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne's "Studies in Christianity" on God's infinite love for humanity.

Program for the SCLC Mass Meeting

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

This program is for a SCLC Mass Meeting that took place, at the Norfok Municipal Auditorium, on October 1, 1958.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Satan

Dr. King records a note on the Bok of Job, chapter 1, verses 11 and 12.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from Yolanda Riverra to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Yolanda Riverra, a student, writes to Mrs. King expressing sympathy for Dr. King's assassination.

Program from Community Salute to MLK: Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 17, 1964

This program is from the Community Salute to Dr. King that occured in New York City following his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from James P. Dixon to MLK Requesting a Donation

Monday, November 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Dixon discusses his early life, his journey to Antioch College, and requests help from Dr. King in funding the same program that put Dixon through college.

Letter from a Tenant to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King received many unsigned letters from tenants in sub-standard housing in urban areas. Chicago was one of the main cities because Dr. King actually lived and conducted SCLC business there for a time. A tenant from a Chicago apartment complex writes to Dr. King suggesting that he discreetly visit the building to learn first hand of the unacceptable living conditions.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Letter to Dr. Benjamin Mays Regarding a Contribution

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King gives Dr. Mays, president of Morehouse College, a contribution for the great work he has done for Morehouse and humanity.

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.