Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Hatfield, Mark O"

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children announces a program that will bring war-maimed children from Vietnam to the United Stares for medical treatment.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Thomas S. Maloney to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965

Rev. Thomas S. Maloney informs Dora McDonald that he has yet to recieve previously requested materials regarding Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Phale D. Hale

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Rev. Hale on Union Grove Baptist Church's 75th Anniversary.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Letter from Abie Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Mr. Williams, a former parishioner of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, now imprisoned, bids Dr. King's pastoral advice. In addition, he requests a few of Dr. Kings books for studying purposes.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Rejection Letter from MLK to Areatha G. Bailey Regarding the Freedom Fund Dinner

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King informs Areatha G. Bailey that he will not be able to attend the Freedom Fund Dinner.

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Victor Capron Requests MLK Deliver Condolences to Lt. Col. Odumeguu Ojukuu

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Capron requests that Dr. King deliver a personal message of condolence to the President of Biafra, Lt. Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. MLK's trip to Biafra in March of 1968 was canceled.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from Lou House of Chicago's WAAF Radio to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Mr. House, a representative of WAAF radio station in Chicago, forwards a letter to Dr. King and mentions his hopes for Dr. King and Al Raby to do a weekly report about the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Letter to SCLC from Preston Warren

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Bucknell University Department of Philosophy Chairman Preston Warren, a supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, reduces his usual $5 contribution to $1 because of his disagreements with Dr. King's stance against the war in Vietnam.

Award Letter from Stanley Faulkner to the SCLC

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Stanley Faulkner, Chairman of the Edward K. Barsky Fund writes to convey the fund's admiration for the valuable work the SCLC puts forward in the field of civil rights. As a result of SCLC's efforts the fund makes a sizable contribution in the amount of $500 for which they requested no publicity be given.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Telegram from The Mathis Family to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

The Mathis family sends their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.