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Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Letter from Sampson & Sampson to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Ms. Dora McDonald received this telegram pertaining to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The sender requests that Mrs. King speak at a political action event in South Carolina. The author of this telegram was running for state senate.

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

SCLC Strategy North/South

This document addresses indifference of the Northern and Southern movement contributions. The direct-action techniques that are exercised in the South do not exist in the North. The SCLC is in need of a fundamental and effective political action in the North. The primary focus is to lay political foundations for the basic social and economic reforms throughout the nation.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Letter from George Richard to MLK

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King's sermon outline references the Biblical text in Ezekiel 22:30.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

Man

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology” on man as the telos (purpose) of creation.

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

SCEF Policy Statement

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

Monday, August 21, 1967

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Support from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Mr. Taylor expresses his disappointment in the City of Atlanta's decision to arrest Dr. King along with 14 other individuals.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.

Eisenhower (His Nationalism)

Dr. King writes a few notes on President Eisenhower's speech made at Lafayette College in 1946. President Eisenhower states that because the United States is the greatest force in the world, it should extend its influence to protect itself.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.