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"Hatfield, Mark O"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Fundraising Letter from Dr. Benjamin Mays to Dr. MLK, Jr.

Friday, September 28, 1962

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College sends an urgent request to alumni to assist in furnishing rooms for a newly completed dormitory. As a distinguished alumni of the college, Dr. King is requested to lend financial support to this endeavor.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Letter from Spencer Beach to MLK

Thursday, April 14, 1966

Spencer Beach expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King and SCLC's stance on challenging "administration policy" about the Vietnam War. Even though he agrees that the Vietnam War is unjust, Beach feels that Dr. King should narrow his concerns to civil rights marches and issues within the United States.

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from Dora to Joan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding the topic "Paint"

This notecard, entitled "Paint", expresses Dr.King's ideals and philosophical viewpoint on the purpose of mankind.

Letter from Ludmila Van Sombeek to MLK Regarding Holy Land Pilgrimage

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Ludmila Van Sombeek wrote this letter to Dr. King, encouraging him to visit Mount Carmel in Haifa, Israel, during his upcoming visit to the Holy land. She writes that Haifa is home to a shrine to the martyr prophet of the Baha'i Faith.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Death of a King

Mrs. D. M. Murray wrote this poem, entitled "Death of a King," following Dr. King's assassination. Murray writes "you've set an example for us here, your very presence brought us cheer" and adds a post script asking the recipient to contact her.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from David Caputo to MLK

Saturday, June 22, 1963

David Caputo extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at Miami University. Mr. Captuo requests that Dr. King responds in a timely manner so that honorarium can be negotiated.

Postcard from Clara Ward to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

Ms. Ward addresses this postcard to Dr. King per her visit to Vietnam.