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Letter from MLK to Frank Jones

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King writes Rev. Jones of Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta to acknowledge receipt of his contribution to the Albany Movement. Dr. King informs Rev. Jones that his check will be forwarded to Dr. William G. Anderson, founder of the Albany Movement, to assist in the work of the desegregation alliance.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

NCNP Role in the South, 1968, with Proposed Budget

Hosea Williams writes Mr. Pepper persuading him to have a program for the National Conference on New Politics in the South. He feels the programs would help many of the states in the South come together through a south-wide congress. Mr. Williams then includes the targeted states and cities as well as the financial aspects to make sure this program is a success.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

Letter from MLK to Eleanor Martin

Friday, October 11, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Martin for her recent letter, in which she praised his book, "Strength to Love." He also informs her that he will happily accept her invitation to visit her Sunday school class if he has the opportunity.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

Program - Dexter Avenue Baptist Church 18th Anniversary Banquet 1957

Friday, December 13, 1957

The printed program, shown here, was for an anniversary banquet, in celebration of the 80th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King became the pastor at Dexter Avenue from 1954-1960. Mr. T.M. Alexander, of Atlanta, Georgia, is listed as the keynote speaker. Dr. King delivered the invocation and closing remarks for the anniversary banquet, held on December 13, 1957.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.

Deism

Dr. King defines "deism" as a concept developed by a group of English and French religious thinkers who "interpreted God purely in terms of natural order" during the 17th and 18th century.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Wendell Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Wendell Thomas sends Dr. King his support along with a copy of the digest for his recent book, "Toward a World Culture."

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

Public Statement by the Albany Movement

Tuesday, January 23, 1962

The statement from the Albany Movement addresses issues of racial injustice and stresses the importance of equality for all.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Letter from Mary Tumbull to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mrs. Turnbull expresses her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their hard work in human rights.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. C. Williams

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy C. Williams for his hospitality during his visit to Denver and for raising funds for the SCLC.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.