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Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964
New York (NY), HUNGARY

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Bryan Fulks

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Arizona (AZ)

Dr. King thanks Bryan Fulks for sending him a copy of "The Humanist" magazine.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

Letter from Dr. Herman Klugman

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. Herman Klugman, Dr. King's German-language tutor at Boston University, offers his congratulations on the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. He states that, as a Jew whose people experienced Nazi persecution, he has watched the "Gleichberechtigung" (equal rights) struggle with deep emotion.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Cambridge, MA

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

SCLC Duties

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Louisiana (LA), Tennessee (TN)

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from the Employees of Western Yard to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Employees of Western Yard of Detroit send a contribution to Dr. King. The employees highlight citizenship training, literacy education and voter registration as the top initiatives of the civil rights movement.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Barth

Dr. King writes on Barth's stance on the authoritative values of the Bible "in the tradition of Calvin."

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Unity West Program

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Washington (WA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Unity West issues this worship program for June 1967.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's concept of religion.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

Love in Action

GREECE, ISRAEL

Dr. King expounds on the love of God by referencing a verse from the Bible in the Book of Luke. The verse states, "Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." Dr. King notes the truth of this verse is also revealed in race relation of today.

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

Letter from Wilton Hall Jr to MLK

Friday, January 13, 1967
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY

President of Droke House Publishers, Wilton Hall, Jr., requests copies of Dr. King's speeches, sermons, press conferences, articles, and interviews for the completion of a book volume entitled "The Quotable Martin Luther King."

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Agenda for Executive Staff Meeting of SCLC

Monday, July 20, 1964
Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This document contains an itinerary for an upcoming Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff meeting.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

Washington, D.C.

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York (NY)

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

World's Fair "Stall-In"

Dr. King comments on a civil rights demonstration scheduled to be held at the World Fair. This united act is aimed to address Negro civil concerns in relation to unified housing, education, and employment.