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Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY, Oregon (OR)

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Letter from MLK to Emily C. Greco

Wednesday, March 7, 1962
Boston, MA

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of The Winsor School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

SCLC Report of the Director

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism


This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Letter from Philip Foubert to Joan Daves

Saturday, November 28, 1964
Washington (WA), New York, NY

This letter dated November 28, 1964, was sent to Joan Daves from Philip Foubert. Foubert, editor of ECHO at Seattle Prep, writes to Joan Daves requesting that Dr. King write a "short letter, suitable for publication in our yearbook and addressed to the students of Seattle Prep."

SCLC Press Release for Mrs. King

Monday, October 19, 1964
Kansas (KS), New York (NY), Missouri (MO), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York, NY

This document announces Mrs. King's election to the Board of the United Church Women.


Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.


Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, Boston, MA

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963
Stockholm, Sweden

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), CANADA

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".