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Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

Draft Telegram from MLK to Federation of Teachers

In this draft telegram, Dr. King addresses the Federation of Teachers enthusiastically endorsing the efforts of New York City teachers to improve their living and working conditions. Dr. King urges the teachers and parents to dispel conflict as they face a contentious Board of Education. Dr. King makes a key point informing parents that it is not the teachers "withholding education but those who have forced them to resort to desperate measures."

Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Sunday, January 13, 1963

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Letter from Edward Enyedy to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Mr. Enyedy writes to Dr. King to inform him of a mock Presidential convention sponsored by TIME Magazine and asks Dr. King for any campaign material he can provide.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Saturday, July 26, 1958

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

MLK Thanks Rev. Isaac Green

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Isaac Green of Central Baptist Church thanking him and his congregation for their contributions to the S.C.L.C.. He explains that without those contributions the conference would not be able to work effectively reach its goals.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Letter from MLK to Senator Jennings Randolph

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to the Honorable Jenning Randolph, US Senator from West Virginia, for supporting passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.