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Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Cyprian of Carthage

Dr. King briefly outlines the life of Saint Cyprian of Carthage.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967
JORDAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

The New Frontiersmen

New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Vermont (VT), Colorado (CO), CHINA, CUBA, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Shreveport, LA, Iowa (IA)

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter From Kivie Kaplan to MLK

Sunday, February 5, 1967
Florida (FL), JAMAICA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Kaplan thanks "Coretta and Martin" for their cards and acknowledges the preparation of Dr. King's fourth book.

Adverse Note to MLK on Political Cartoon

Birmingham, AL

This anonymous critic of Dr. King described their grievances on a political cartoon from The Birmingham News that referred to Dr. King as a hypocrite.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Washington (WA)

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, VIETNAM, Iowa (IA), Des Moines, IA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, HUNGARY, Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, California (CA), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, ISRAEL, DENMARK, FINLAND, NORWAY, SWEDEN, West Virginia (WV), MEXICO, Arizona (AZ), CHINA, London, England, UZBEKISTAN, Florida (FL), SWITZERLAND, AUSTRIA, BRAZIL, ARGENTINA, CHILE, VENEZUELA, POLAND, CZECH REPUBLIC, UKRAINE

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
Memphis, TN, California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Letter from Erma Burton to the Steering Committee of SCLC

Monday, October 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Erma Burton stresses the importance of preserving important SCLC documents for the purpose of not only securing information for future research, but so that there will be no misinformation about their own history. She gives guidelines for how the documents should be protected and stored.

Death

Dr. King documents a quote from Pascal regarding "Death."

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Telegram from Gabriel Allen to MLK

Florida (FL)

Gabriel Allen writes Dr. King to state his opinion on when civil rights will be achieved in America.

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Virginia (VA)

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
California (CA)

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Chicago, IL

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.