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Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Letter from Frank Schiffman to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965

Frank Schiffman of the Apollo Theatre in New York, New York, sends Dr. King a large check to start the "Dr. Martin Luther King Freedom Fleet."

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Knowledge

Dr. King references a biblical scripture regarding the topic knowledge.

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Atheism

Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Letter from Eartha Kitt to MLK

Eartha Kitt expresses her admiration for Dr. King and his cause.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.