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Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from Lionel H. Newsom to MLK Regarding Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

In this letter, Lionel H. Newsom, the General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., provides Dr. King with a check for support.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from Townsend Scudder to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

Townsend Scudder, of the Friends Service Committee, contacts Dr. King to request the use and reproduction of the Birmingham Letter to appear in their pamphlet.

Letter from Robert Beverly to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Robert Beverly of the City Employees Union Local 237 writes to Dr. Abernathy informing him of the enclosed May edition of the union's newspaper.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."

Rio Grande Farm Workers Bulletin

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

This bulletin describes the difficulty that migrant farm laborers have encountered forming organizations to improve economic conditions.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jutson Sapp

Friday, July 10, 1964

Dr. King writes Mr. Sapp expressing how unhappy he is concerning Mr. Sapp's difficulty in receiving assistance from the Social Security Program.

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Tuesday, March 8, 1966

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Telegram from MLK to William Miller

Friday, February 16, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. William O. Miller, of the Concerned Teachers and Parents of Philadelphia, commending them for their efforts advocating for African-American education in their community.

Letter from West Virginia NAACP to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962

William M. Grayson informs Dr. King that he is seeking information regarding his availability to attend a speaking engagement.

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.

Morehouse College's Standing Among 192 Colleges

This document ranks Morehouse College against other colleges in a variety of areas, including endowment, number of Ph.D's on the faculty, and graduates with Ph.D's.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.