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"INDONESIA"

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Telegram from Author William Peters to Coretta Scott King Regarding a Book Opportunity

New York (NY)

Peters was contracted to co-author the Myrlie Evers book by Random House. Random House then suggested he do the same with Coretta Scott King.

Letter from David Joel to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

In this letter, Joel writes Dr. King requesting assistance with a term paper on "Black Power". Joel is a sophomore at Briarcliff High School and is writing a term paper for his World History course. He hopes that King can offer a more clear explanation of the "Negro situation" and he also includes specific questions for King to answer.

God

Dr. King cites Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach's work "Das Wesen der Religion," in which Feuerbach illustrates his perception of God.

Theology

Dr. King asserts that religion and theology must coincide with one another because, "religion without theology is blind; theology without religion is empty."

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from James Huger to MLK Regarding Recent Visit

Monday, January 15, 1968
Florida (FL)

Mr. Huger, City Commissioner of Dayton Beach, Florida, informs Dr. King how much he enjoyed a recent visit to Ebenezer, and wishes Dr. King good health and success.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Operation Breadbasket Seminar

Chicago, IL

This brochure explains the economic development program "Operation Breadbasket." It consists of Negro and white clergymen of all faiths who are working to build a solid economic base among Negro people.

A New South A-Coming

Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Mars Lecture Series

Tuesday, April 15, 1958
Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Notes for Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council Youth Program

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Leaders of the Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council outline a brief youth program to be held one afternoon in the Royle School, in which a video tape of one of Dr. King's speeches will be played for the students in attendance.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Harvey Cox

Monday, August 2, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Andrew Young requests a photograph and biographical sketch of Harvey Cox, a well known theologian. The materials will be used for publicity of a convention that Cox will be making an address.

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959
Montgomery, AL, GREECE, JORDAN, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from MLK to Randolph Compton - February 22, 1968

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Randolph Compton for his one thousand dollar donation to the SCLC. He also acknowledges that this contribution assists in the work of voter registration and securing decent jobs and decent housing for the poor.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Maine (ME), Pennsylvania (PA)

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Letter from Ruth A. Salinger to MLK

Thursday, November 14, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Maryland (MD)

Salinger requests that Dr. King provide contact information for civil rights leaders along the route of a scheduled trip to study race relations to be taken by high school students from the church communities of Concord, Massachusetts.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from Dr. C. O. Simpkins to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Dr. Simpkins writes Dr. King to discuss the actions he has taken to end discrimination in the Dental Society. He expresses that a letter from national leaders like Dr. King would assist him greatly in his endeavors with the American Dental Association.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Illinois (IL)

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.