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Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY)

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
San Francisco, CA

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Arkansas (AR), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), United Press International, United States Federal Housing Administration., NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), National Urban League, Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), Syracuse University, Tuskegee Institute, United States Supreme Court, United States. Congress, Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), SOUTH AFRICA, Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Tennessee (TN), Des Moines, IA, New Hampshire (NH), Oklahoma (OK), Michigan (MI), KENYA, Alabama (AL)

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

Justice

Dr. King provides his views regarding the concept of justice.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, South Africa

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Letter from Robert Kyser to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Keyser, Coordinator of Choice '68 at Graceland College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials, just three weeks before his assassination. Choice '68 was the Time Magazine sponsored collegiate primary for the Presidential election in which Dr. King and Dr. Spock were encouraged to run as a ticket.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1962
New York, NY

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Louisville, KY, New Orleans, LA

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter to MLK from Stewart Meacham

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Nashville, TN, Missouri (MO)

Stewart Meacham writes Dr. King about his availability to attend a conference hosted by the American Friends Service Committee at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He mentions the theme of the ocnference, other invited guests, and that the orgranization is prepared to cover Dr. King's travel and housing expenses.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Texas (TX)

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.