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Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964
Baltimore, MD

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965
Montgomery, AL

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Telegram from Rev. Benjamin Bickers to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966
New Orleans, LA

Reverend Benjamin Weldon Bickers sends his congratulations to Dr. King on his birthday and expresses his inability to be present during the celebration due to prior engagements.

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.


Dr. King references God and quotes theologian Paul Tillich from "Systematic Theology: Reason and Revelation."

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Letter from Murillo Millin to SCLC

Friday, April 20, 1962
New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Murillo Millin, President of the Van Buren Block Association, Inc., makes a contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.


Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles H. Smith

Tuesday, January 30, 1962
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. King regrettably informs Rev. Charles Smith that he will not be unable to make an appearance at the First Baptist Church in West Virginia. Due to Dr. King's schedule and commitments to his home church, he finds it difficult to accept any invitations for the next several months.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

SCLC Newsletter: January-February 1966

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL

This early 1966 SCLC Newsletter reports the organization's recent activity. Main columns focus on Hosea Williams' voter registration work in Birmingham, Alabama and efforts towards slum eradication in Chicago and Atlanta. The document also includes photographic content of Dr. King's public speaking endeavors and evidence of the slum crisis. Consistent school inequities and segregation are the last topics discussed.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Request for MLK's Autograph

Thursday, October 21, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Thomas Smith, Director of Placement at Saint Peter's College, requests that Dr. King autograph a program for friends of Father McGlinchey.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, February 5, 1964
New York (NY), New Hampshire (NH), Atlanta, GA

Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King hoping to have lunch with his family at Pocantico Hills. His intent is to raise funds for the Urban League of Westchester County and the SCLC.

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Jacob Broertjes

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

Dorothy Gaines encloses a copy of all of Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young's expenses while in Amsterdam for the Baptist Federation Convention.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960
Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Notecard titled Person (From a Theological Standpoint)

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on what a person is from a theological standpoint. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

The Trinity

Dr. King records the definition of "The Trinity" as described on page 43 of "Dogmatics" in Outline by Karl Barth.