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Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Monday, February 25, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967
Chicago, IL

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

Telegram from Bea and Andy Stanley to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Bea and Andy Stanley send Dr. King a telegram while he is in the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta. The Stanley's express, "we are inexpressibly proud that the determination to end segregation is upheld with such dignity and self sacrifice."

Telegram from Nathan Cooper to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA, ALGERIA

Referring to Dr. King as a southern fascist, Nathan Cooper telegrams his demands for an immediate two- hour national radio television civil rights debate.

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Vermont (VT), GERMANY

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

Oklahoma (OK)

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Montgomery, AL

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Montgomery, AL

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, New York (NY)

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Western Union Telegram from Harrison Tweed and Bernard G. Segal to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965
Selma, AL, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Tweed and Mr. Segal urge Dr. King to observe Judge Johnson's order prohibiting marches to Montgomery, Alabama. They also enclose an excerpt of their telegram to Governor George Wallace compelling him to restrain law enforcement from excessive force.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
GERMANY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Pennsylvania (PA)

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Monday, June 7, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Letter from Mr. Matthias Mirschel to MLK

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berlin, Germany

In this letter Mr. Matthias Mirschel of Kirchliche Hochschule Berlin expresses commitment to Dr. King's stance against American intervention in Vietnam as well as integration for colored citizens. "We ask you not to cease with your endeavors...many people in the USA and all over the world hear your voice and support your campaign," writes Mr. Mirschel.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Called To Responsible Freedom

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, GHANA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH)

Mount Olivet sponsors a youth week program of Christian education featuring Dr. King as a keynote speaker.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.