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Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Eutychius

Dr. King gives brief biographical detail on Eutychius.

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Letter from Thomas R. Hughes to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Thomas R. Hughes, Executive Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture, sends Dr. King Orville Freeman's Senate testimony on the Department's efforts to improve nutrition for low-income families and provide food assistance throughout the country.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Letter from MLK to H. A. Cruse

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Dr. King extends support to H. A. Cruse, an individual whose constitutional rights were violated. Dr. King emphasizes that it is not just Negroes who have been "subjected to victimization resulting from failure of Southern law enforcement authorities to follow constitutional practices."

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter from MLK to W. David Angus

Monday, October 14, 1963

This letter is in response to Mr. W. David Angus from Dr. King, referencing an invite to speak in Montreal. However, Dr. King acknowledged that he would be out of the country.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ralph Bunche inquires if Dr. King and his wife will be available for lunch and dinner with himself and members of the United Nations before leaving for Oslo.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter asks what Dr. King is doing for his people. He or she recommends the rich Negro people in the community help the poor just as the American Jewish community helped Israel.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”