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Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967
California (CA), Nebraska (NE), Nashville, TN, Louisville, KY, New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, South Africa, ISRAEL

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961
Ohio (OH), CHINA

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates

Missouri (MO)

Dr. King composes a draft for a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates. He expresses his appreciation for their contribution and encouraging words. He discusses the SCLC's support of other organizations that are consistent with Judeo-Christian values and conveys their dedication to equality.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

Letter from Alberta Brown to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

The Adah Grand Chapter write Dr. King regarding an enclosed check for the SCLC.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New York, NY

The United Federation of Parents, Teachers and Students present the Malcolm X Memorial flyer saluting American Freedom Fighters. Honorees include LeRoi Jones, Bill Epton and Dr. Benjamin Spock. Slated guest speaker, H. Rap Brown and many other community activists/entertainers.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from MLK to J. Martin England

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King express his appreciation for Mr. J. Martin England's support.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

People in Action: Albany Justice

CUBA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Telegram from Wyatt T. Walker to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Wyatt T. Walker confirms his attendance at a meeting with President Kennedy at the White House.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Letter from Nathaniel Barber to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Georgia (GA)

Nathaniel Barber addresses Dr. King and encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC in the amount of $5.00. Barber sends his prayers to the Reverend and asks for a suitable picture to hang on the wall of his office.

Letter from Senator William Proxmire to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

US Senator William Proxmire writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for the Reverend's previous letter regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.