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No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.


Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Mr. Brita Hakansson

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Mr. Brita Hakansson to contact Dora McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in September of 1962.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 29, 1963

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

In this copy printed in "The Christian Century," Dr. King writes his letter in response to several Alabama Clergymen who accuse him of being unwise and untimely. His accusers call him an extremist and an "outside agitator" who should not be in Alabama. Dr. King references several sources in his counter to their arguments.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."