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Syllabus In Christian Education

This syllabus outlines the various elements of a course entitled "Christian Education" from Dr. King's experience at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Scientific Method (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Religious Experience and Scientific Method." He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Order of Contingents In April Parade in New York

This document lists the parade order for an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in New York. It also lists official slogans and regulations concerning the use of signs and placards.

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter to MLK Regarding Swedish Record Sales

Monday, April 25, 1966

Chris Folcker follows up with Dr. King regarding sales figures and payments related to the sale of a recording in Sweden.

Letter from William M. Grayson to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

William M. Grayson, the President of the local NAACP chapter in West Virginia, requests the help of Dr. King to assist the organization in gaining more members. Grayson asks that Dr. King provide a schedule and availability for when he could possibly provide aid.

Letter from Carole A. Burnett to MLK

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Mrs. Burnett informs Dr. King that her and her husband's financial support of the SCLC is suspended due to Dr. King's support of the Spring Mobilization and Vietnam Summer program. Though the Burnetts support the peace movement, they feel these two groups "present Hanoi's view of the Vietnam war."

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

MLK's Index Card Referencing Bertrand Russell

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bertrand Russell's views on man.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from MLK to Beulah H. Brunson

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Beulah H. Brunson of the Georgiana Thomas Grand Chapter O. E. S. for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King comments on the progress made over the past decade in improving conditions for Negroes in the South.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.