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To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Telegram from Mr. Aubrey Williams to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Members of the Board of The Southern Conference Educational Fund write to Dr. King and express their admiration for the stand he has taken.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Inter-Office Telephone Extensions

Documented are the telephone extensions for the SCLC office staff.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Letter from Annie Mae Williams to MLK

Sunday, May 2, 1965

Annie Mae Williams and her family make a contribution of $25 to Dr. King.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Irv Kupcinet encloses a clipping on the Soldier Field Rally for Dr. King. Kupcinet closes by requesting the Reverend's appearance on his television show.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Request for Preliminary Determination of Eligibility - Nonprofit

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

This document serves as a request to establish Ebenezer Baptist Church as a Non-Profit Sponsor or Mortgagor.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, the President of the Parliament of Greece, welcomes Dr. King to Athens during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King cites a page in "The Personalist" on the existentialism in Kierkegaard's philosophy.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

God (His Love)

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne's "Studies in Christianity" on God's infinite love for humanity.

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Ball

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the Inaugural Ball following the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.