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Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Show Business Salute to Danny Stradella

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Joey Adams invites Dr. King to attend the AGVA Youth Fund dinner featuring Danny Stradella.

Postcard Addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Father Martin Genghty of New York issued this postcard to Rev. Ralph Abernathy following Dr. King's assassination. The holy leader referred to Rev. Abernathy as "the Good Shepherd for his flock."

Letter from W. B. Blix to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

W. B. Blix writes to Dr. King to express his support of the Civil Rights Movement. However, Blix also informs Dr. King that he has lost his support because of Dr. King's preemptive decision to commit civil disobedience if the Poor People's March on Washington is unsuccessful.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Atheism

Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

Brightman's Idea of God

Dr. King references philosopher and theologian Edgar Brightman's idea of God. According to Brightman, God is finite and "powerful enough to lead the work toward higher and higher levels."

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry Cohen

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, drafts this correspondence to Rabbi Henry Cohen in regards to a book he is publishing. Miss McDonald informs Rabbi Cohen that Dr. King grants permission to use excerpts from "Letter From Birmingham Jail." She also mentions the enclosure of Dr. King's reply and Dr. King wanting a copy of the book when published.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Letter from MLK to Mary Wood

Monday, April 18, 1960

Dr. King wrote this letter to Mrs. Mary D. Wood to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes that he appreciated her including comments on his book, "Stride Toward Freedom," and that he's glad that she found it helpful.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from Gregory Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Mr. Ferguson invites Dr. King to be the commencement speaker for the 1968 graduating class of Berkeley High School in Williamsburg, Virginia. The school can only afford $150 for a speaker, but he feels Dr. King's presence would make a great impact on the student body.

St. Augustine Tutorial Project

This document references a tutorial program organized by students from Yale for the benefit of students in St. Augustine. The flyer advises those interested in the program to stop by the SCLC office and fill out an information sheet.