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Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Christmas Card from the King Family

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

Correspondence - Contribution Thank-You Letter from MLK to Chris Folcker 8/16/66

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

In this document Dr. King expresses great appreciation for the Swedish Consul General's donation of $100,000. The amount of this contribution would underscore that Sweden's commitment to Dr. King's work and the civil rights movement in general did not stop at the proverbial edge of the Nobel Peace Prize's water.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

Telegram to Governor Carl Sanders

The SCLC writes to Georgia Governor Carl Sanders regarding the murder of Andy Whatley in Americus, GA.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis Barge

Friday, September 24, 1965

In this letter addressed to Rev. Barge and Friends, of the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association. Dr. King expresses his gratitude for a contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current endeavors of the organization and conveys the importance of their contribution.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Findings and Recommendation Committee

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1961

In this letter, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King with an enclosed check to assist with the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Alice Glaser to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Alice Glaser, Assistant Editor for Esquire Magazine, requests that Dr. King write an article entitled "A Day in a Southern Jail" regarding the actual details of his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.