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People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Get Well Letter from Olive Andrews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Dr. King received this kind get well letter from Mrs. Olive Andrews, noting that she and her family prayed for his healing. She, furthermore, expressed that something good might come out of his unfortunate situation.

Scientific Method (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes Henry P. Van Dusen’s article “How Do We Know?” from The Christian Century on the scientific method as central to Henry Nelson Wieman’s thinking. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

Different Meanings of Prehension

Dr. King outlines the different meanings of "prehension" in Alfred North Whitehead's books Science and the Modern World and Process and Reality.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Secretary of Morehouse College Board of Trustees, J. H. Wheeler, inquires if Dr. King will be in attendance for the annual meeting.

Letter from MLK to Edwin C. Berry

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Dr. King thanks Edwin Berry of the Council of Coordinating Organizations for presenting the Rosa Parks Award to Al Raby at the annual SCLC convention.

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Thursday, October 9, 1958

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Letter from Dr. Mircea Tanasescu to MLK

Dr. Tanasescu asks Dr. King to help him receive permission from the Romanian government, so that his family may enter the United States.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Letter from Daniel Tyler to MLK

Monday, February 15, 1965

Author Daniel Tyler discusses the contributions he has submitted to the National Baptist Convention. He requests that Dr. King send him information on how to assist the cause of voter registration.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

God (Malachi)

Dr. King references various Bible passages that are related to God.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Sunday, November 12, 1967

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

Letter from T.Y. Rogers to MLK

Friday, January 6, 1967

T. Y. Rogers, an assistant to Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery writes the Reverend expressing his interest in traveling to Israel to tour the country with him. In addition, Rogers offers to assist with funds if necessary.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

Saturday, April 1, 1961

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.