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Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

Monday, September 19, 1966

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Dora Byron wrote this letter to Dr. King inviting him to participate in a television program at Emory University.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.


Dr. King cites several verses from the Book of Numbers.

Letter from SGH to MLK

SGH inquires about sending money out of the country in order to efficiently donate to Dr. King's causes.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.


Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Secretary of Morehouse College Board of Trustees, J. H. Wheeler, inquires if Dr. King will be in attendance for the annual meeting.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.

Unsigned Memo to Arthur Shores

Monday, November 6, 1967

In this memo to Mr. Shores, the author wants to get an update status on eight clients that served sentences in Birmingham for parading without a permit. Dr. King was sent a copy of the memo.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Letter from MLK to Members of First Congregational Church Expressing Thanks For Their Contribution

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King offer his gratitude to the Fist Congregational Church for its contribution to the S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.