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"ISRAEL"

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 26, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves provides Dr. King with suggested wording for the acknowledgment to Hermine Popper in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?".

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

Resurrection

Dr. King writes about resurrection, according to Daniel 12:2.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Letter of Condolence from Martin and Coretta Scott King to Mrs. Lee Gaber

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Mr. & Mrs. King express sincere condolences to Mrs. Lee Gaber and family during her time of grief.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

God (His Existence)

Change title to conform to Dr. King’s filing system.

The Martin Luther King Column

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
New York (NY)

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes about God's love, quoting and reflecting on Proverbs 3: 11-12.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
New York, NY, Florida (FL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Little Rock, AR, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD), Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964
New York (NY), FRANCE, ITALY, SPAIN, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, London, England, SWITZERLAND, ISRAEL, DENMARK, NORWAY, SWEDEN, SOUTH AFRICA

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Letter from Sonja Lid Larssen and Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, FRANCE

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway congratulates Dr. King on his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and requests that he presents for the inhabitants of Stavanger. The authors detail four reasons why he should accept this invitation, with one including a public meeting concerning nonviolence.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Letter from Rev. William M. Brooks to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN)

William Brooks, Executive Director of the Gary Neighborhood House, requests Dr. King's permission for his staff to visit the SCLC Chicago office to observe their work being done in the slum areas.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962
Georgia (GA)

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966
Chicago, IL

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.