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Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Wednesday, May 19, 1965
Berlin, Germany, GERMANY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
CANADA, SOUTH AFRICA

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Handwritten Notes Individuality and Participation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on individuality and participation. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Annual Report (Urban America Inc.)

This card references the Poor People's March on Washington of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Washington, D.C.

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Eleanor R. Compton to the SCLC

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Michigan (MI)

Eleanor R. Compton, Recording Secretary for the Council on Human Relations, contributes $10 to the SCLC.

Joshua and Judges

Dr. King cites Biblical scriptures from the books of Joshua, Judges, and 1 Samuel.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Cleveland, OH, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS)

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 29, 1963
Indiana (IN)

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), Florida (FL), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Richmond, VA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet advertises the 1963 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Convention. It contains detailed information about the event, including members of the planning committee and scheduled presenters.

Letter from Paul Feldman to MLK About New Publications

Friday, January 26, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter Paul Feldman, the Publications Coordinator for the League for Industrial Democracy, informs Dr. King of the upcoming publication of a new work entitled, "American Power in the Twentieth Century" by Michael Harrington. Feldman also informs Dr. King of the predicted demand for the publication and urges him to place his order early.

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from Welton B. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, March 23, 1966
Chicago, IL, Missouri (MO), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

The 376 and 400 National Veterans Association request Dr. King as a speaker for their Sixth National Reunion Convention in an effort to become an active organization in the struggle for equal rights. The convention chairman, Welton M. Smith, informs Dr. King that a $300 donation would be distributed upon the acceptance of this speaking engagement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin Brown

Thursday, October 14, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald responds to Benjamin Brown of CORE on behalf of Dr. King. She tells Mr. Brown of Dr. King's travels and urges him to pick up a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" in order to find a fitting quote to publish in the "CORE Guide."

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Herbert Coulton Appointed Director of Affiliates of SCLC

Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Mr. Herbert Coulton is appointed the Director of Affiliates for the SCLC.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
GERMANY

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.