Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ITALY"

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Letter from William Kunstler to Arthur Shores

Friday, March 9, 1962
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Attorney William Kunstler writes to Arthur Shores about a legal case involving Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth.

Letter from Jack Tatum to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Jack Tatum lets Ms. Dora McDonald know that he will be in Atlanta from November 16th-20th, 1967. He states that he would appreciate a meeting with Dr. King and the SCLC executive staff.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee of the Kennett Consolidated School, contacts Ms. McDonald in an attempt to reschedule an event cancelled by Dr. King.

Letter from the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Milwaukee, WI

The executive board of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket informs Dr. King of the works and efforts of their organization. The SCLC's Operation Breadbasket originated the very principles and methods in which the Milwaukee chapter operates. The chapter has initiated many employment opportunities and increased the economic status of the Negro community. Dr. King is requested to provide them with the official documentation to charter their chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Furthermore, they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to see Dr. King in an appearance in Milwaukee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, Arkansas (AR), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW ZEALAND

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961
Nashville, TN

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
CANADA, Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Kenneth Pierce to MLK

Kenneth Pierce was recently released from Fulton County jail and informs Dr. King that he would like to speak to him about an "important situation." Mr. Pierce also references another cellmate who would like to communicate to Dr. King or one of his representatives as well.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

EGYPT, CONGO / ZAIRE, GHANA, SUDAN, SOUTH AFRICA, NIGER, ZIMBABWE, BENIN, NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, FRANCE, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
VIETNAM, New York, NY

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Monday, October 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962
Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Barnard Holliday

Friday, November 29, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Reverend Holliday, Pastor at Pond Street Baptist Church, thanking him for his contribution and words of encouragement. Dr. King also encloses a receipt for his donation.

Challenge on Luther King

Thursday, November 18, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965
South Africa, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, ANGOLA, MOZAMBIQUE, New York, NY, New York (NY), CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, GERMANY, JAPAN

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Letter from Ernest Marshall Howse to MLK

Friday, January 10, 1964
CANADA

Rev. Howse invites Dr. King to preach at the Craddock Student Mission in Toronto during Dr. King's planned trip to the area.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.