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Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1961
New York, NY

This letter from Harper & Brothers expresses concerns for the completion of a forthcoming book.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.


Dr. King writes about resurrection, according to Daniel 12:2.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?


This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land


This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.


Dr. King quotes Psalms 28:3, which he interprets as showing the importance of one's intentions and mental attitude.

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

Letter from Cindy Eder to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Cindy Eder sends Dr. King warm wishes for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond about a Visit to Lyons, France

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Madame Bremond for a pleasurable visit to Lyons, France at which occurred a "great ecumenical gathering."

Martin Luther King's Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

The Facts and Activity Program of the Swedish Organization developed "The Martin Luther King Fund" to raise money in support of Dr. King. The group has raised funds through the sale of tickets and recordings at the Stockholm Opera.

Mission to Mississippi

California (CA), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

Project "C" Progress Report

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Johannesburg, South Africa, GEORGIA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

Letter from MLK to James Hoffa

Monday, December 19, 1966

Dr. King offers support to James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, several months prior to the start of Mr. Hoffa's prison term at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Wisconsin Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1961
Wisconsin (WI)

The Racine Chapter of the NAACP Banquet Committee invites Dr. King to speak at their annual banquet.


Dr. King notes several New Testament passages that pertain to knowledge.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Idaho (ID), New York (NY)

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Honolulu, HI, Texas (TX), London, England, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Article regarding MLK

Chicago, IL

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Schedule for Trip to Oslo, Norway

DENMARK, SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Atlanta, GA, London, England, KENYA, Stockholm, Sweden

This document contains the schedule for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway. During this trip, Dr. King is scheduled to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and meet with King Olav V of Norway.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Missouri (MO)

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.