Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ITALY"

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

Letter from Philip Watson to MLK

Monday, December 21, 1964

Mr. Watson praises Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and describes the award as a "global testimony" to Dr. King's leadership.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Ralph Ahlberg to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Minister Ahlberg extends condolences on behalf of The Congregational Church of Rockville Centre to Rev. Abernathy upon the assassination of Dr. King.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Letter From Martin Peretz to MLK

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

Martin Peretz asks Dr. King for an autograph while commending his courage in the struggle for justice and peace.

Letter from the Martin Luther King Fund to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

A representative from the Martin Luther King Fund corresponds with Miss McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

Invitation from Earl S. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Earl S. Smith invites Dr. King to speak at Montevideo, Uruguay on the methods of nonviolence in Latin America.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Dr. King sends his condolence to Rev. Burtenshaw of the Catholic Archdioceses of Atlanta for the death of Archbishop Hallinan.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.