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Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
New York, NY, INDIA, London, England, NETHERLANDS

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Royalty Statement

Friday, June 30, 1967
New York, NY

This statement provides figures of terms and earned royalties for the German-language edition "Strength to Love."

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Milwaukee, WI

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Chicago, IL

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Harry H. Kruener to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Brooklyn, NY

Rev. Kruener invites Dr. King to speak at Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims in 1963 to commemorate the church's designation as a national landmark.

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Detroit, MI

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the meaning of a miracle.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

New York, NY

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

National Committee to Combat Nazism's Resolution on Civil Rights

Sunday, May 28, 1967
Chicago, IL

The National Committee to Combat Nazism passed this resolution, affirming the Civil Rights Movement and agreeing to send Dr. King and President Johnson a copy of their stance.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, JAPAN

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Louisiana (LA), Birmingham, AL

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Dexter Echo: February 3, 1960

Wednesday, February 3, 1960
FRANCE, London, England, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Johannesburg, South Africa

This issue of the Dexter Echo honors Dr. and Mrs. King's final day at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Florida (FL), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Cable from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Payment

Monday, January 29, 1968
New York, NY, PORTUGAL, BRAZIL

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King references payment by Editora Senzala Ltd. for the Portuguese-language rights to "Why We Can't Wait."

Memorandum from Dorothy Cotton to SCLC Staff

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Dorothy Cotton provides the SCLC staff with instructions for and information about the Tenth Annual Convention, including suggested procedures, details about transportation and expenses, and staff work assignments.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes an insight from American psychologist and philosopher William James regarding metaphysics.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

Washington, D.C.

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

L. Seyler's Report on Emil Brunner

L. Seyler from Christian Social Philosophy at Crozer Theological Seminary writes this paper on Emil Brunner, Swiss Protestant theologian. Written around February 20 - May 4, 1951, the paper contains subject matter regarding the crisis of contemporary culture.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Texas (TX), VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.