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"Illinois (IL)"

Letter from MLK to Rev. Bartos

Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Florida (FL)

This undated draft of a letter by Dr. King focuses on the discrepancies of medical care and academic admissions "well known by Southern Negroes."

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968
Minnesota (MN)

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Post Card from Jerry Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

Jerry Smith writes to Dr. King who is in the Birmingham Jail. Smith accuses Dr. King of not being a genuine reverend, but a communist hate monger.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Indiana (IN)

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Biography of MLK

Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., NORWAY

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA)

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
California (CA)

William Kivi passes on information to Dr. King pertaining to public reaction regarding poverty spending in the state of California. He claims that state Republicans under the adminstration of Ronald Reagan have undermined the purpose of the federal aid designed to "allay undernutrition and malnutrition."

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Selma, AL, Jackson, MS, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Boston, MA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961
Ohio (OH), CHINA

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers for MLK

New York, NY

This document features a royalty statement from Harper & Row, Publishers, for Dr. King's "Strength to Love."

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Washington, D.C., California (CA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nevada (NV), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Montana (MT), Connecticut (CT), Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN)

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Judith Van Swaringen

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dorothy Gaines, assistant to Dr. King, responds to a letter from Judith Van Swaringen suggesting that she read the enclosed biographical sketch.