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"Indiana (IN)"

Letter from Leonard E. Loper to MLK

Saturday, June 8, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN)

Leonard Loper, of Mount Zion Baptist Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can be the keynote speaker for the church's Men's Day service.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

An Interview With MLK

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965
JAMAICA, Ohio (OH)

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, August 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Letter from Raphael Demos to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Nashville, TN

Professor Demos commends Dr. King on his statement in "Christianity and Crisis" and inquires whether Dr. King was a student of his at Harvard. Demos also expresses his views on race relations in the South.

Proposed Program: Lincoln Memorial

Washington, D.C.

This program entails several male and female speakers who are deeply rooted and connected in the Civil Rights Movement. These speakers were expected to speak at the Lincoln Memorial.

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962
Boston, MA

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

MLK Appearance List

Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), Maine (ME), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), London, England, Berlin, Germany, New York, NY

This itinerary highlights Dr. King's appearances over a six month period.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Georgia (GA)

Lillian Smith writes to Dr. King in regards to being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, she expresses her admiration of his leadership, and how his success has helped her through her numerous hospital visits.

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962
New York, NY

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Telegram from MLK to Judy Silver & Gordon Geller

Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King salutes the Cincinnati Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry for their efforts to end discrimination against the Jewish people of the U.S.S.R.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

California (CA)

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Suffering

Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.

Letter from Guy Heinemann to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Guy Heinemann states that several copies of the Civil Rights issue of the Yale Political have been sent to Dr. King.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.