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Letter from P. G. Harkins to MLK

Mrs. Harkins, program chairman of the Voice of Women, requests that Dr. King speak for the organization when his schedule permits.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from Honi Coles, Jackie Robinson and Arthur Logan to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965

Dr. King is informed of an event honoring Frank C. Schiffman, Director of the Apollo Theater, for his support of Negro entertainers and for providing jobs in the Harlem community. The gentlemen also present the SCLC a check for $5,500, which they hope will be used to purchase vehicles for the SCLC Freedom Fleet.

MLK's Notes On the Influence of Radio

Dr. King records information regarding religious broadcasting. He list percentages of public influence, prize giveaways and other relevant historical details.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the offers being made from a Japanese publisher, to purchase the rights to "Strength to Love."

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Telegram from Washington CORE to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

The Washington CORE asks Dr. King to clear up the apparent misunderstanding that Dr. King approves of Coleman for the fifth circuit.

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

Thursday, November 9, 1967

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Dr. King writes Mr. Shriver to offer assistance to farmers who have been treated unfairly.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Gwendolyn E. Coleman to MLK

Thursday, March 4, 1965

Mrs. Gwendolyn Coleman, Secretary of the Raleigh County Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak during a Freedom Rally in an effort to unite the community for employment.