Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Indiana (IN)"

Notes on Literary Genre

"Every story has a plot, every story has a climax," writes Dr. King, in these handwritten notes to describe an unknown fairytale or some literary genres.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 22, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Old Testament History Notes

ISRAEL, EGYPT

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

Saturday, January 25, 1964
Washington, D.C., Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY, GERMANY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, North Carolina (NC), Massachusetts (MA), JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, PHILIPPINES, MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TANZANIA, GUATEMALA, PERU, CHILE, BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL STATE OF, COLOMBIA, KENYA, EL SALVADOR, BRAZIL, VENEZUELA, New Orleans, LA, Nashville, TN, Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), Colorado (CO), Montana (MT), GERMANY

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
CANADA, New York, NY

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

American Labor Problems

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
New York, NY

AFON received a grant of $60,000 from the Stern Family Fund. Mr. Wachtel offers Mr. Hunter a report of progress and invites him to a conference concerning the grant.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Letter from Stanley Slota to MLK

Arizona (AZ)

Stanley Slota writes Dr. King to acknowledge how proud he is of him and expresses his desire for more people to give back to the poor.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arkansas (AR), Hot Springs, AR, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 29:13-14, noting that man can find God if he searches with all his heart.