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Letter from David Diamond to MLK

Tuesday, May 31, 1966

David Diamond, author of the book "A Bucket of Whitewash" inquires about Dr. King providing commentary for his upcoming release. As a result, Diamond is set to share royalties from his book sales with the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Maurice B. Fagan

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald confirms receipt of recent letter from Mr.Maurice Fagan. She conveys to Mr. Fagan of Dr. King's desire to nominate The Honorable Richard Hatcher Mayor of Gary, Indiana, for the 1967 National Fellowship Award.

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Sermon Outline

This document outlines sermon notes and ideas. Dr. King references passages from the book of Luke. He also wonders what Christ did to give people hope when their desires had not been reached. King also discusses that Jesus conquers time, where as, human beings are victims of time.

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Financial Statement Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Sunday, December 31, 1961

In this document, the number of books that were sold during the six month period to December 1961 are shown.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Proposal: Pilgrimage to Rome

The Pilgrimage to Rome proposal addresses peace issues for an audience with Pope John. The proposal elaborates on the different aspects of the pilgrimage including political approaches, the involvement of women, arrangements, meetings and more. The proposal also entails excerpts from the first responses to the pilgrimage.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

SCLC Staff Meeting - Suggestions and Assignments

These notes from a SCLC staff meeting discuss a plan of action for the Chicago Campaign and the Soldier Field rally. The document covers an array of topics, such as advertising, speaking engagements and smaller rallies.

Phillip O. Foss Seeks Permission to Use "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Sunday, February 12, 1967

Philip O. Foss writes to Dr. King in hopes of receiving permission to use excerpts from the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in his new text book.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

The Negro

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Letter from Frank Randolph Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, April 17, 1968

Frank Randolph highlights how Dr. King "brought to light" many things that were once unseen. Mr. Randolph writes this letter subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King and notes that he would like copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech. The writer is apparently unaware of Dr. King's death.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.