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Letter from Cranor F. Graves to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Cranor F. Graves expresses his gratitude to Dr. King for greeting him on the plane. He encloses a copy of Pope Paul 's Easter encyclical. He also extends his best wishes to Mrs. King.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Personality

Dr. King cites a quote from J. M. E. McTaggart's understanding of personality from "Studies in Hegelian Cosmology."

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Thompson

This letter, addressed to a Mrs. Thompson, illuminates the issue of negros who have found themselves employed as mailmen despite being privi to some skill set obtained though either a B.A. or B.S. degree.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Letter from Dr. William G. Anderson to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Dr. William G. Anderson accepts Dr. King's invitation to join the Board of Directors of the SCLC for a three year period.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Letter from John A.McDermott to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, invites Dr. King to be a special guest of honor at the annual John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. Theodore C. Sorenson, former Special Counsel to the late President Kennedy, will be the principal speaker at this event. Dr. King received the award two years earlier.

Letter from A. T. Gabriel to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

A. T. Gabriel writes Dr. King enclosing monetary contributions from the Local Union and the Birmingham Committee for Civil Rights of Local 110. Gabriel asks that Dr. King acknowledge the contributions with a letter explaining the progress of his work.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Ode to Freedom

Monday, July 20, 1959

"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Mary Welcome to MLK

Miss Welcome praises the work that Dr. King has done for civil rights. She also offers him her prayers and promises to send money to aid the cause when she is able to afford it.

Letter from Whitney M. Young to Friends

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Whitney Young, Executive Director of the National Urban League, urges African Americans to educate themselves on the opportunities that the U.S. Navy offers.

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista

Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.