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Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Art - Aesthetic

Dr. King notes several passages from Paul Tillich's "The Religious Situation." The quotes relay the importance of art and its aesthetic value on the function of spiritual situations.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Letter from Donna Dlugos to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Donna Dlugos of Fontbonne College asks Dr. King about receiving information for Time Magazine's 'Choice 68' campaign.

Letter from Elbert Ransom Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 18, 1966

In this letter from Mr. Ransom to Dr. King the former welcomes Dr. King to "our complexed [sic] city." The author also expresses nostalgia for previous shared experiences and his hopes for the future of the movement.

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

Friday, September 28, 1962

George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Jesus

Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Socialism for the Rich, Free Enterprise for the Poor

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In a speech to the Hungry Club at the Atlanta YMCA, Rev. Andrew Young, Executive Director of the SCLC, asserts that the American economy is a system of "socialism for the rich and free enterprise for the poor," a contest between the "haves and have-nots." He claims that the space program and the Vietnam War are threats to domestic poverty programs.

God

Dr. King cites Sigmund Freud's view in "New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis" that the need for religion stems from the Oedipus complex.

Letter from Barnes and Smith to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Account Executive M. J. Orman proposes that Dr. King use a reflective decal manufactured by his company as a fundraising item.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Telegram from the SCLC Staff Wishing a Happy Birthday to MLK

The SCLC staff members wish Dr. King a happy birthday and commend his "struggle for total democracy in our nation."

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter to Kenneth Gibbs from Dora McDonald

Monday, September 30, 1963

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Gibbs a letter of thanks for his kind letter of support and encloses an autographed cover of TIME magazine on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Chicago Schedule

Dr. King lists the flight numbers and times associated with his travel from Atlanta to Chicago.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.