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Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Letter from Stephen Weeg to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965

The University of Notre Dame's Committee on Negro Enrollment seeks advice from Dr. King on where to obtain financial aid for African American Students.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King discusses the primary three dimensions of life, which include: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Frank Emspak, Chairman of the National Coordinating Committee, writes Dr. King requesting SCLC's sponsorship for the anti-war convention. This letter helps track activities of national peace movement.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Immortality

Dr. King references Thomas Carlyle regarding the topic of immortality.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Letter from Detroit Resident to MLK

Monday, November 21, 1966

The Detroit resident identifies the Negro man's concept of equality as being intertwined with the sexual exploitation of white women. The author references an article that cites the disparity in numbers of illegitimate children amongst blacks and white.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

Letter from Jeanette Harris to MLK

Sunday, February 23, 1964

Jeannette Harris writes Dr. King, enclosing her resume in hopes of being employed by the Gandhi Society in San Francisco.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.