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Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

SCLC's Tom Offenburger requests Dr. King's permission to go to Cleveland to do a story on the Cleveland Project.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Adam Clayton Powell to the Friends of Black Power

Friday, November 11, 1966

Adam Clayton Powell issues a notice to the Friends of Black Power requesting that they enhance their strategy in order to be effective. He conveys that one person leading the charge of Black Power will slow down the momentum of its purpose. Powell suggests that a National Conference on Black Power be governed by multiple conveners.

Letter from Maurice N. Eisendrath to Dr. Bernard Lee

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Maurice N. Eisendrath request Dr. Bernard Lee to provide a list of the contributors from Dr. King's address to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. The list is to facilitate Mr. Eisendrath in contacting other contributors to raise additional funds for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Andree Dwan Gipson to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Andree Gipson, Director of the Human Rights Committee of the University Student Government, proposes a reception for Dr. King during his visit to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Gipson also sends Dr. King a copy of the student newspaper, POST, that announces the date of Dr. King's speaking engagement.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

Sunday, March 17, 1968

An anonymous individual conveys to Dr. King his frustrations with President Johnson and the Vietnam War.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

Worship

Dr. King notes some characteristics and requirements of worship.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.