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"JAMAICA"

Letter from MLK to Joseph White

Monday, January 30, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Dr. White's contribution to the SCLC and apologizes for the delay of response that was due to a high volume of other calls and letters.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Letter from Marilyn Thomburgh to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Marilyn Thomburgh writes Dr. King addressing the issue of polluted water in the US and asks why there is nothing done about this matter.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

Friday, November 25, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., ZAMBIA

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Progress

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
CANADA

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Ethics

ISRAEL

Dr. King maintains the Prophet Amos was saying that Israel's privilege would be proportionate to its ethical responsibility. Failure to live up to this responsibility would result in retribution equal to the severity of the failure.

Telegram from Carole Hoover to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Carole Hoover offers encouragement to Dr.King while he is incarcerated in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Friday, November 13, 1964
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
Cleveland, OH

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962
Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA, Pittsburgh, PA, SOUTH AFRICA

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Montand of France, for his financial contribution as well as his personal support for the success of the movement in the United States.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 11, 1967
New York (NY)

Gitta Badeker informs Dora McDonald of an offer from Santi Ando & Figli for the Italian rights to "Where Do We Go from Here," and includes administrative instructions on how to proceed.

Neighborhood Spotlight on Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

This document contains information regarding the Urban League Housing Program, which provides statistical information on the communities in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area.

Letter from William H. Shell to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

William H. Shell is preparing an address for a high school graduation and is in need of various documents surrounding Dr. King's organization. Mr. Shell desires to know the detailed goals of the Civil Rights Movement, civil rights techniques, and the education demographics for the early 1960's.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

VIETNAM

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL, Little Rock, AR, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
San Francisco, CA, THAILAND, South Carolina (SC)

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.