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Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding The Critic in Chicago

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the only magazine commitment to-date with The Critic in Chicago.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Rev. George W. Gunn

Friday, August 6, 1965

Reverend Andrew Young informs Reverend George Gunn of the Presbyterian University Center that he will not be in attendance at the Campus Ministry Association meeting due to an emergency situation in Americus, Georgia that requires his special attention.

MLK's Notes On the Influence of Radio

Dr. King records information regarding religious broadcasting. He list percentages of public influence, prize giveaways and other relevant historical details.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Letter to Harry J. Cargas from Dora McDonald

Monday, December 9, 1963

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Cargas' letter which included an enclosure of the December issue of "The Queen's Work,"a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society. Ms. McDonald tells the sender that Dr. King is out of town, and the package will be brought to his attention upon his return to Atlanta.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. Some of the topics discussed include the role of the SCLC, Operation Breadbasket and a voting bill.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Coordinating Center to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

A.L. Everett conveys pleasure in knowing Dr. and Mrs. King are sponsors of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, and that Dr. King will be speaking at an upcoming rally in San Francisco on April 15th. Everett requests that any further press releases concerning the planned demonstrations in both San Francisco and New York also include statements from both Dr. and Mrs. King.

MLK Note Card - Abstract Elements and Sets

Dr. King discusses the philosopher Wh's perspective of the abstract element known as a moment.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Dorris M. Roberts to MLK

Dorris Roberts, Chairman of the New Breed Committee, writes to Dr. King concerning inaccurate statements regarding her organization's participation in a recent march. Mrs. Roberts encloses a newspaper article regarding the march and also requests that Dr. King release a statement declaring that the New Breed Committee were supporters of the march and not protestors.