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Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, New York (NY)

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

Letter from Harry Stern Shams to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

Harry Stern Shams requests a personal letter for his birthday from Dr. King.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Evil

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends" on the subject of evil.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962
Oklahoma (OK)

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Telegram to Dr. Wyatt T Walker

Thursday, November 2, 1967
New York (NY)

The Members of the Brotherhood of Faith offer support to Dr. Wyatt T. Walker while in the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Citation for MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1961
Connecticut (CT)

This document contains the passage read on the occasion of the conferral of an honorary doctoral degree from University of Bridgeport to Dr. King.

Justification (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

Thursday, January 1, 1959
New York (NY), DENMARK, NORWAY, FRANCE, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, GHANA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965
Wyoming (WY)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Maine (ME)

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962
New York, NY

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention Brochure

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This document is a program from the SCLC's Seventh Annual Convention in Richmond, Virginia. The event was hosted by Curtis Harris, president of the Virginia unit of the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Ralph McGill Regarding Bereavement

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this telegram to Ralph McGill, Dr. King expresses his sympathy for the passing of his wife.

Letter from Stiv Jakobsson to MLK

SWEDEN, FINLAND

Stiv Jakobsson expresses his wishes for Dr. King's well being due to the recent attacks against him. Various organizations in Sweden are engaging into an annual conference and are confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at the event.

Telegram to Charles Wherry from Frances Lucas

Saturday, November 23, 1968
California (CA)

Frances Lucas writes to Mr. Wherry in Mrs. King's stead thanking him for his kindness and congratulating him on a film project. He also conveys appreciation from Mrs. King for the memorial of her husband at California State College.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter from Rev. Sterling E. Glover and Rev. Henry Payden to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Reverend Glover informs Dr. King that he was surprised to hear that a statement was released regarding the planned summer conference. It was Reverend Glover's impression that no information would be released to the press, so that relations between the United Pastors Association and the SCLC would not be tainted.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.