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"JAPAN"

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.

Letter from James Schlatter to MLK

Friday, December 17, 1965

James E. Schlatter, a student at Illinois State University, writes to Dr. King to request his comment on the effects of civil disobedience on law and order for his term paper on law enforcement.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Atheism

Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from The Norwegian Student Association to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Norwegian student representatives reference a letter from Hakon Knutsen of the American Baptist Convention, inquiring about Dr. King's availability to address student groups during his stay in Norway.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Hugh Gloster to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Hugh Gloster, President of Morehouse College, sends a copy of the brochure "The Negro & Higher Education In The South", to Dr. King. He also mentions the Morehouse Board of Trustees meeting, in New York, Nov. 9th.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Christianity (History Of)

Dr. King quotes Harkness on the history of Christianity. Likely this is American theologian Georgia Harkness.

Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.