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"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Letter from Angela Reyes to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Angela Reyes offers her condolences to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962
Atlanta, GA

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Our God is Able

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a chapter draft of the sermon for Dr. King’s book Strength to Love. Using Jude 1:24 as his text, Dr. King expounds on his belief that there is a God of power that is able to sustain the universe, conquer the evils of history, and give us the interior resources to face the trials of life. He speaks of his own experience of turning to God when he was exhausted and overcome with fear after a telephone death threat. His inner peace restored, he was able calmly to accept the news three days later that his home had been bombed.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Brooklyn, NY, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Telegram from Bennette, Calhoun and Ellis to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

J.H. Calhoun, Ocelia Ellis and Fred Bennette send their prayers and support to Dr. King during Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham City Jail.


Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.


Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

A Religion of Doing

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

Letter from MLK to the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP

Tuesday, March 27, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA)

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

SCLC Mail Log: January 29, 1968

Monday, January 29, 1968
Texas (TX), Connecticut (CT)

This document contains a record of received mail for several members of the SCLC Executive Board.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967
Georgia (GA), Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964
New York, NY

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.