Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"JAPAN"

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965
SWITZERLAND, New York (NY)

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

SCLC Mail Log: January 29, 1968

Monday, January 29, 1968
Texas (TX), Connecticut (CT)

This document contains a record of received mail for several members of the SCLC Executive Board.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

Saturday, December 8, 1962
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Irene Dunaway Requests Sermon from SCLC

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Irene V. Dunaway of Daly City, California writes the members of SCLC requesting a copy of Dr. King's recent address on the ABC network. She admires the sermon as "one of the greats," and would also like to "brush up" on her knowledge of history pertaining to Vietnam.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Washington (WA), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This is an ad and itinerary for the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

Vietnamese Student's Appeal for Peace

VIETNAM

This document reveals that a Vietnamese student burned herself as an appeal for peace. The document also states that some of the writings that she left behind have been translated.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Operation Breadbasket Pamphlet

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

This pamphlet describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Operation Breadbasket initiative.

Ezekiel and Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the biblical verse Ezekiel 20:21. He states that the prophet makes it clear that among the greatest sins of the Israelites was "profaning the Sabbath."

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Alabama (AL), FRANCE

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965
Michigan (MI), Selma, AL

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Milwaukee, WI

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter from James L. Hicklin, III to MLK

Thursday, February 14, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

James Lewis Hicklin, III of The Freedom For All Foundation, inquires if Dr. King will serve on the organization's National Board of Governors.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Letter from MLK to Jacquelyn Dowd

Monday, July 15, 1963
Memphis, TN

Dr. King informs Jacquelyn Dowd that he will not be able to speak as invited in Memphis.

MLK's Plans for Cleveland

Dr. King outlines programs and development that he will implement in Cleveland. King frequently went to Cleveland throughout his time as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.