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Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Theological Seminary (Its Function)

Dr. King cites an article by Ernest Cadman Colwell, "Toward Better Theological Education," published in the Journal of Religion.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Power for the Powerless - SCLC's Basic Challenge

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), VIETNAM

This report outlines the objectives of the SCLC, as well as programs and projects led by various departments. It also includes a staff listing and organizational chart.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, JAPAN

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter to MLK from Paul Feldman

Friday, January 26, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Paul Feldman is writing Dr. King about the new release of Michael Harrington's pamphlet "American Power in the Twentieth Century."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Benjamin Hooks

Friday, November 11, 1966
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter Dr. King solicits the help of Mr. Hooks regarding allegations that SCLC associate Hosea Williams purchased stolen automobiles for SCLC. Dr. King asserts that the allegations should be investigated fully and enlists the aid of Benjamin Hooks, Chauncey Eskridge, and Joe Lowery.

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Telegram from MLK to Joan Baez

Friday, December 29, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King sends encouraging words to Joan Baez, an American singer and civil rights activist, who is imprisoned at Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "The Ultimate Doom of Evil." The text is derived from a Biblical text, which states that one should not fret over evil doers because God is our vindicator.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Meeting of Action Committee

Friday, March 22, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King sends a meeting notice to members of the SCLC Action Committee. He also includes a list of reports to be prepared concerning the Washington Mobilization.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from Resident of Dade County, Florida to MLK

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Florida (FL)

An anonymous writer requests Dr. King's assistance for youth in the Juvenile Court System of Dade County, Florida.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, January 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY, CHINA, CUBA

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Truth

Dr. King quotes Thomas Aquinas' "The Summa Theologica."

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, VIETNAM

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Kjell Eide

Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Oslo, Norway, Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Eide for postponing his visit to Moscow. The Reverend postponed the trip due to the election of a Negro for mayor in Cleveland. Dr. King is hopeful that his visit can be rescheduled for mid-November.

Letter from MLK to William Kivi

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter to Mr. William Kivi, Dr. King expresses his view on the representation of the American flag.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.