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Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, November 26, 1964

August Schou of the Nobel Committee responds to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding Dr. King's arrival in Norway for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. Schou explains the importance of Dr. King arriving at the recommended date as well as the proper attire and a short list of other individuals invited to join Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Hildegard Goss-Mayr, Secretary for the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invites Dr. King to speak at a conference in Brazil.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Telegram from Rev. Enoch Jones to MLK

Saturday, November 28, 1964

Reverend Enoch Jones informs Dr. King that the Baptist Minsters Conference of Nashville, Tennessee have selected Dr. King for their Emancipation Proclamation speaker. Reverend Jones provides information about the event in hopes that Dr. King will accept.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Worship

Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

Memorandum from Dr. King

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Nietzsche

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Letter from Harper & Row, Publishers Regarding Royalties

Friday, October 2, 1964

Harper & Row Publishers write to inform the recipient that they deducted money from an enclosed royalty check due to an outstanding balance for books purchased.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.