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"Jackson, MS"

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, January 20, 1965
Montgomery, AL, PUERTO RICO, NIGERIA, PERU

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

History

Dr. King reflects on history as it pertains to human society.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

MLK Notecard - "Revelation"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Revelation," Dr. King quotes from Niebuhr's NDM, I, 127.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
ITALY

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

Statement Adapted from MLK Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech

Sunday, July 30, 1967
FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT

Tom Offenbburger requests Dr. King's permission to forward this adaptation of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech for publication in the French newspaper, "Ouest France."

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
Chicago, IL

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Oklahoma (OK), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from Harry Walker to MLK

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Harry Walker writes Dr. King to ask his appearance at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey to speak with the institution's new student body.

Letter from Mike J. Daumer to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mike J. Daumer requests information from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference regarding Dr. King to be used in Choice '68.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Florence W. Lee to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
New Orleans, LA, Missouri (MO)

National Secretary of the Ladies' Auxiliary, Knights of Peter Claver, Florence W. Lee, encloses a check for one hundred dollars to further SCLC's numerous endeavors.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Florida (FL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, INDONESIA, NEW ZEALAND, AUSTRALIA, PHILIPPINES, JAPAN

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Boston, MA

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Letter to MLK from Andrew W. Loewi

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King asking him to sign a petition against the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.