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The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

Holiday Card from Dr. Nirmal Kumar Bose

The following document is a holiday card from Dr. Bose to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Letter from A.J. Hoffman to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

In this letter, A.J. Hoffman offers a few words of admiration to Dr. King for his work for the "brotherhood of man."

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from John H. Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

John H. Johnson, President and Editor at Johnson Publishing Company, informs Dr. King that a soldier has donated money to his organization and the NAACP.

Schleiermacher (Original Sin)

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher’s views on original sin.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milton Rokeach

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Rokeach concerning the involvement of social scientists and the civil rights movement. Dr. King encourages Dr. Rokeach to become actively involved with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Norberto Ibarrondo to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965

Norberto Ibarrondo, President of Children Organization for Civil Rights, writes Dr. King expressing their desire to replace "discrimination with brotherhood." Ibarrondo informs Dr. King of a fundraiser their organization sponsored and encloses the money as a contribution. Ibarrondo also states that their school is dedicating their yearbook to President Kennedy and Dr. King.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.