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Thank You Letter from MLK to Dr. J.M. Stansberry

Monday, July 20, 1964
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. Stansberry for his contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King states that without the aid from supporters, the initiatives of SCLC could not be carried out effectively.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966
Georgia (GA)

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

New York, NY

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

National-Zeitung Questionnaire

SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The National-Zeitung of Switzerland asks questions surrounding the current international issues of peace and the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Telegram from Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne to James Meredith and MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne salute James Meredith and Dr. King for their service and dedication to the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Selma Friendship Day Report

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963
Alaska (AK), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961
New York, NY

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter of Condolence from Anny Elston

Saturday, April 6, 1968
New York (NY)

73 year old widow Amy Elston, who makes contributions sparingly to the SCLC, is deeply impacted in her philanthropy in the wake of Dr. King's death and decides to send this letter, along with a contribution, to the SCLC to show her support in the advancement of the actualization of Dr. King's dreams.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Michael J.. Gerstley

Friday, March 29, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss McDonald sends Michael Gerstley an autographed card per Dr. King's instructions.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.