Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jacksonville, FL"

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

MLK Schedule

This schedule of Dr. King's lists the dates and places he will be for the month of September and October.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Sermon Notes: Christianity Explored

Dr. King discusses the various concepts of the religious body of Christianity. He specifically highlights the Christian perspective in relation to life, the Kingdom of God on Earth, and Jesus Christ.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Lenin

Dr. King labels a quote from Vladimir Lenin "a false dictum."

Invitation from Haile Selassie I to MLK

Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethiopia, invites Dr. King to his birthday anniversary at the Shoreham Hotel.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from Phillip S. Gelb to MLK

Saturday, May 4, 1963

Mr. Phillip Gelb encloses a donation to the SCLC and states that he appreciates the efforts being made by the protestors in Birmingham. Furthermore, he identifies the movement as the "most vital and pro-American in the nation today."

Royalty Statement for French Edition of The Strength to Love

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the French edition of Dr. King's "The Strength to Love," published by Casterman S.A. for the period October 1, 1965 to March 31, 1966.

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Tisdale

Thursday, April 5, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Miss Tisdale that the information she requested may be found in Dr. King's book, Stride Toward Freedom, or Dr. Lawrence Reddick's book, Crusader Without Violence.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Seymour Siegel in Appreciation for Being Awarded an Honorary Degree

Wednesday, July 3, 1968

This letter from Dr. King to Dr. Seymour Siegel extends appreciation for being awarded an honorary degree from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Letter from Laverne Gobble to MLK

Monday, September 19, 1966

Laverne B. Gobble encloses a publication entitled "Your Vote Makes a Difference," and informs Dr. King of the Votemobile schedule. She also expresses that if he is interested she can assist with educating members of his organization about voting.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.