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Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Letter from MLK to James Marley

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks James Marley for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief summary of how the funds benefit the Negro communities.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968
Alaska (AK)

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Washington (WA)

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962
PUERTO RICO, CUBA, Washington, D.C.

Beresford Hayward, Planning Consultant of the Department of Education in Puerto Rico, writes Dr. King to inform him of the racial climate in Puerto Rico and its issue of Cuban immigration. Mr. Hayward also presents a comparison between the race issues inflicting Puerto Rico and the United States of America.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967
CHINA, Atlanta, GA

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Letter from M. Strawder to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
Chicago, IL

M. Strawder welcomes Dr. King to the Chicago community while informing him of the current social struggles that they are faced with.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS)

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Illinois (IL), Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Letter from Philip M. Weightman to MLK

Friday, January 3, 1964
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA

Philip Weightman invites Dr. King to attend the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education's conference at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Weightman also briefly explains what will be discussed at the conference.

Notes on Movies

Monday, October 9, 1967

The writer states that the movie industry needs more stories without the 'Playboy' touch. He argues that this should come from the "masses" and not "society."

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.