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"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
New York, NY

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Role of the Church

New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Washington, D.C., California (CA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nevada (NV), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Montana (MT), Connecticut (CT), Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN)

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Letter from Chandrasekhar and Gouri Bhattacharya to MLK

Saturday, December 25, 1965
INDIA

Chandrasekhar and Gouri Bhattacharya of Calcutta, India request that Dr. King send blessings to their daughter Chirashree on her second birthday.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

Washington, D.C.

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

Chicago, IL

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

New Jersey (NJ)

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963
CANADA, Detroit, MI

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

William E. Channing

Baltimore, MD

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Letter From MLK to Mrs. William Lescase

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY

Dr.King thanks Mrs. William Lescaze for her contribution to the SCLC.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from Lula Belle Williams to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Lula Williams writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help to pay her rent before she is evicted.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Letter from Bernetta Chapman to MLK

Chicago, IL

Bernetta Chapman writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the Westside of Chicago. Chapman heard the Reverend speak at the Buckingham Foundation stating, "there should be more people like you."

Letter from Leon Forer to Dr.King

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

Leon Forer expresses that Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here" is a "sobering testament to our times." In this letter he also makes a suggestion to change the appendix.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

ISRAEL

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Letter from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter, dated March 6, 1968, Minister Jones urgently requests photostatic copies of letters and newspaper clippings concerning "Jet Cruiser," as well as "Lost Potentials."

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.