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Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

Thursday, August 18, 1966

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Project Head Start: A Pre-school Program for Children

This letter and enclosure from Project Head Start, sponsored by the OEO, is written to an anonymous recipient describing some of the features of the program.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a Bon Voyage to Europe

Thursday, January 29, 1959

The Fair Share Organization presents Dr. King in a "Bon Voyage to Europe." Dr. King will be delivering an address for Indiana Reverend Julius James, a former Morehouse College classmate of Dr. King's. Also included are advertisements of people and businesses who donated to the Fair Share Organization.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

MLK Note Card - "God"

On this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "God," Dr. King evokes an interpretation that would suggest the reverse of existentialism (existence before essence).

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

Thursday, April 9, 1964

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.