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Newspaper Article on MLK Advertisement in "The Washington Afro-American" August 29, 1964

Saturday, August 29, 1964

Here, in this newspaper clipping, is an advertisement of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", The ad also makes reference to the reverend, being chosen as Time magazine's "Man of the Year".

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves provides Dr. King with suggested wording for the acknowledgment to Hermine Popper in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, CHINA

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Washington (WA)

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962
New York, NY

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Jack Greenberg congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ross D. Davis

Friday, December 3, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak to the Woman's National Democratic Club in Washington, D.C. He explains that he has an engagement in a different part of the country on the same date.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Oklahoma (OK), Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

An Interview With MLK

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Monday, June 29, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King extends his heart-felt appreciation to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Oliver for their hospitality during his visit to San Diego.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Mr. Reed, Mr. Baldwin and Slums

Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes a story pertaining to a Mr. Reed and Mr. Baldwin to describe the importance of keeping after one's soul.

Schleiermacher (Relation of Morality to Religion)

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality to religion.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961
BERMUDA

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.