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Letter from Emily A. Fortson to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Ms. Fortson requests Dr. King contact her immediately regarding a press release to announce his upcoming pilgrimage. She informs Dr. King that both Jews and Arabs have shown "intense interest" in the trip.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason."

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter Dated 12/7/62 from MLK's Secretary to Mel Arnold

Friday, December 7, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a enclosure of the sermon entitled "Broken Dreams."

Telegram from Patricia E. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Patricia E. Smith writes Dr. King to congratulate him "on dignity maintained and balanced general gently Christian position."

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Letter from Jim Vickrey to Thomas Offenburger

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Jim Vickrey of Auburn University requests that Thomas Offenburger, Director of the SCLC Office of Public Relations, provides information regarding Dr. King's background.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.

Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Press Release Regarding President Kennedy's Involvement in the Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dr. King repeatedly called on the support of the White House in the struggles toward civil rights. In this press release, he addresses the negotiation process in Albany, Georgia and expresses his gratitude for President Kennedy's involvement.

Letter to MLK from Wyatt Tee Walker of New York's Canaan Baptist Church

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Wyatt Walker comments on the positive relations between Jews and African Americans and asks Dr. King to support the new nation of Israel.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.