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Letter from Dora McDonald to Mildred R. Morris

Monday, August 19, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Dora McDonald responds to Mildred R. Morris on behalf of Dr. King, who will take into consideration her offer after meeting with the Executive Staff of SCLC.

Rev. King Supports Jackie

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This is a press release regarding Jackie Robinson's stand on racial inequality.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Joanne Baker

In this letter, Dr. King offers his instructions and a statement pertaining to the history of the "Negro Revolution of the 1960's," including a statement on the Watts and Harlem riots.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Statement Adapted from MLK Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Tom Offenbburger requests Dr. King's permission to forward this adaptation of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech for publication in the French newspaper, "Ouest France."

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.


Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Letter From Irene M. Kohlmeyer of WBJC to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966
Baltimore, MD

Irene M. Kohlmeyer, Program Director of WBJC radio at Baltimore Junior College, asks Dr. King for his permission to rebroadcast the transcription of a Phi Beta Kappa address he gave at Johns Hopkins University.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Memo From Hosea Williams to SCLC Staff

Friday, March 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hosea Williams, the National Director of Mobilization of the SCLC, sends this memorandum urging members to have their assigned region organized before Dr. King arrives on his People-To-People tour.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Michigan (MI), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

The Eternal Significance of Christ

Dr. King outlines a sermon and references the Book of 2 Corinthians. The passage states "It is impossible to understand the significance of Christ without understanding the whole history of Biblical religion."

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E.Mays to William J. Trent, Jr.

Friday, January 31, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays is notifying William Trent that Dr. King will meet with John D. Rockefellar, III at his office on Feburary 6. What the meeting is about is not specified in the letter.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Hamman

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mr. Hamman for his previous letter in support of Dr. King and his work .

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
New York, NY

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.


Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.


Dr. King notes Niebuhr's definition of sin as the unwillingness to acknowledge the effect God has on one's existence.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.