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"Kansas (KS)"

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966
Delaware (DE)

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from MLK to Mildred Lynch

Monday, December 11, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Mildred Lynch's letter inviting him to visit Toronto. He expresses his appreciation but regretfully declines the invitation due to the future plans of the SCLC.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX)

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

President John F. Kennedy applauds the work of Dr. King and the SCLC on the occasion of the organization’s Sixth Annual Convention.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Announcement Flyer

This flyer to the public announces that W.S.O. and Dr. King will be holding a warm up rally.

New Housing Developments - West

Ohio (OH)

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting on the Concept of "Man"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J.C. Bennett's views on 'Man' according to his book, "Christianity & Communism." Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Letter from Clement Alexandre to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Clement Alexandre sent Dr. King this get well letter following his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY)

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Letter from MLK to Canon Hugh Monteflore

Thursday, January 21, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King declines Canon Hugh Montefiore invitation to speak at the University Church in Cambridge, England due to his pastoral duties at his own church.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Crawford Johnson for an event hosted at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.

Letter from Leonard Zion to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Leonard Zion writes Dr. King stating that SCOPE (Summer Community Organization and Political Action) is organizing students and faculty at Brandeis University in Massachusetts to raise $40,000 to support him. The SCOPE project was run under the auspices of the Atlanta-based SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ), Maryland (MD), Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlantic City, NJ, Texas (TX), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Los Angeles, CA, Tennessee (TN), GERMANY, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI)

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Nero History an Culture

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

This flyer features an adult course offered by Berkley Unified School District. The curriculum includes an analysis of African American history, cultural and socially contextual outlooks.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967
California (CA), Nebraska (NE), Nashville, TN, Louisville, KY, New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Letter from MLK to Brown Brothers Harriman and Company about a Contribution

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to the Brown Brothers Harriman and Company for an anonymous contribution of company stock they forwarded. Dr. King also comments on why such contributions are needed.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966
ITALY, Louisville, KY

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968
Rhode Island (RI), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.