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"Kansas (KS)"

Letter from MLK to Members of First Congregational Church Expressing Thanks For Their Contribution

Friday, January 5, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King offer his gratitude to the Fist Congregational Church for its contribution to the S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry Cohen

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, drafts this correspondence to Rabbi Henry Cohen in regards to a book he is publishing. Miss McDonald informs Rabbi Cohen that Dr. King grants permission to use excerpts from "Letter From Birmingham Jail." She also mentions the enclosure of Dr. King's reply and Dr. King wanting a copy of the book when published.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Monday, December 27, 1965
VENEZUELA, Atlanta, GA

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, Detroit, MI

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962
Chicago, IL, Albany, GA

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Letter from William G. Broaddus to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967
Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The Editor of the Dicta column from The Virginia Law Weekly writes Dr. King to request a contribution to their "Law for the Poor" series. Mr. Broaddus states that an ideal article will discuss landlord tenant problems and offer solutions. He tells Dr. King that his work in Chicago "on the landlord tenant problem...[makes you] well qualified to write on this subject."

Memorandum from William Rutherford to Staff Members

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA

William Rutherford, Executive Director of SCLC, sends a memorandum to the staff informing them of a program entitled "Poverty in Mississippi," which is being broadcast on Channel UHF in the Atlanta area on January 7, 1968.

Luther

Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Letter from Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Solomon Mendelson writes to Dora McDonald to inform her that the "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised and that the Congregation of Beth Sholom will be taking action in seeing that it is properly promoted.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Definition of History

Dr. King explains a definition of history.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Letter from Glenda Stultz to MLK

Sunday, April 26, 1964
Indiana (IN)

Glenda Stultz asks Dr. King to send her information about how he was influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and Henry David Thoreau. She requests the information for a research paper, which she must complete in order to graduate.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Thank You Letter from MLK Regarding Albany Incarceration

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks his supporters for sending him encouraging letters during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, NETHERLANDS

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
New York, NY

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.