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SCLC Staff

Thursday, March 9, 1967

This is a list of the SCLC staff members, their positions, and their responsibilities.

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Letter from Eleanor R. Compton to the SCLC

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Eleanor R. Compton, Recording Secretary for the Council on Human Relations, contributes $10 to the SCLC.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.

MLK honored; He sees Kinship in Civil Rights and Family Planning

Dr. King receives the first Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the National Conference. Dr. King states, "Negroes have a special and urgent concern with family planning as a profoundly important ingredient in their struggle for security and a decent life."

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Go to Black Africa

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

SCLC Press Release

Monday, May 16, 1966

This press release announces Dr. King's election as a Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The statement provides a brief history of the research center, including its affiliation with prestigious figures such as President John Adams and American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. The release concludes with a brief biography of Dr. King.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Dr. Brightman's views on philosophy . This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Negro Population

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.