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"Kansas (KS)"

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
San Francisco, CA, New York, NY

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

Pennsylvania (PA)

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Letter from Mrs. Milton Klein to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mrs. Klein expresses support for Dr. King's recent speeches about ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Chicago, IL

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 8, 1964
NORWAY

In this letter,Joan Daves informs Dr. King that an offer for a Norwegian edition of "Strength to Love" has been made. Joan also mentions that contracts have been made for Dr.King to sign.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN), North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Berlin, Germany

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Henry J. Dillon to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Henry Dillon, Vice President of Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union, writes Dr. King. He states, "as long as you choose to support the discredited program and philosophy of this Local...I cannot support- or ask my members to support your organization."

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

California (CA)

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Tuesday, December 27, 1966
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, SPAIN, Atlanta, GA

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
New York, NY

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967
Georgia (GA)

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1967
New York (NY)

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Albert Shanker, President of the United Federation of Teachers, has been sentenced to fifteen days in jail. He requests Dr. King to contribute $5.00 towards the payment of Mr. Shanker's fine and for permission to state publicly that he has contributed.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.

Letter from Congressman John Conyers to MLK

Friday, October 8, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Congressman Conyers thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the Mississippi Challenge and gives him details regarding the vote in Congress.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Rockefeller writes Dr. King expressing his support for the work King is doing and asserts his desire to assist him in any way.

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.