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"Kansas (KS)"

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963
Boston, MA, Birmingham, AL

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965
Georgia (GA), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from MLK to E. C. Smith

Wednesday, December 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Smith's invitation to speak at Metropolitan Baptist Church and apologizes for his tardy response. Dr. King discusses the "People-To-People" tour of the south and declines the invitation due to his busy schedule.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Letter from Unitarian Universalist Association President Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dana McLean Greeley asks for Dr. King's endorsement of a conference on religion and peace to be held in Washington, DC, and invites Dr. King to serve on the Executive Committee of the conference. Greeley also recounts his time spent in Selma and mentions that he will be in Montgomery soon.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA, NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968
California (CA)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church Third Annual Lecture Series

Friday, November 10, 1961
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Pennsylvania (PA), Montgomery, AL

The Mount Zion Baptist Church presents Dr. King as the key note speaker for their Third Annual Lecture Series. The lecture series will provide the community with a conscientious perspective of the societal issues as recognized by Dr. King. Furthermore, this event will bring aid to the Building Program of Mount Zion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Boston, MA

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Moving to Another Mountain

Connecticut (CT), EGYPT, Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, JORDAN

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from William M. Grayson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, March 13, 1962
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

William M. Grayson, President of a chapter of the NAACP in West Virginia, requests information regarding Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements for 1963.


Dr. King quotes astronomer William M. Smart's concept of God in "The Origin of the Earth."

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Boston, MA, Dallas, TX

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Letter from MLK to Roosevelt Zanders

Thursday, May 17, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Roosevelt Zanders for his hospitality and generosity during his stay in New York. Dr. King expresses his hopes for their paths to cross in the near future and states that he will be sending Mr. Zanders an autographed copy of his book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, GA

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Letter from William S. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William Thompson invites Dr. King to speak at the National Bar Association's 38th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois.