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"Kansas (KS)"

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Letter from Activist Carl Brannin to MLK

Sunday, January 6, 1963

Social reformer and journalist Carl Brannin commends Dr. King's recent speech in Dallas. Brannin also discusses the importance of the Negro community voting in all elections and reports his experience as a poll tax deputy. He expresses frustration at recent elections that would have had different outcomes if the Negro vote had been strong and united.

Rep. Powell Unseating to Stick?

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This article discusses public opinion surrounding former U.S. House Representative Adam Clayton Powell's ethics investigation, and subsequent ousting from office.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, December 15, 1964

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Monday, May 24, 1965

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."