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Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

Monday, February 5, 1968

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

Friday, August 18, 1967

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

Statement by Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan issues a statement on the passing of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1967.

Letter from MLK to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Saturday, April 27, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. T. W. Cole and the members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. for supporting the SCLC financially and morally. Dr. King is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Communism

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Handwritten Notes on Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sin. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

Letter from Rodney Armanie to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Rodney Armanie writes to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Note from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, August 21, 1962

In this notice, Dora McDonald informed Dr. King that Rev. Jackson visited the office and that he has a engagement for January 1, 1963.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."