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Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Telegram from SANE Co-Chair Benjamin Spock to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock, acting as co-chairman of the National Committe for a Sane Nuclear Policy, transmits a telegram to Dr. King inviting him to deliver a speech at Madison Square Garden in reference to Vietnam.

Man (Why He Is Sinful)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Race Relations Sunday

Sunday, February 13, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America writes a message regarding race relations. The message discusses God's stance on prejudice and racism, stating that any prejudice act is against the will of God.

Bond and The Constitution

The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. King receives a letter confirming the telephone call that informed him that he won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. The author then invites Dr. King to come to Oslo to receive the prize.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

The Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts sends a card bearing the Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Tuesday, October 26, 1965

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Paul Feldman to MLK About New Publications

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter Paul Feldman, the Publications Coordinator for the League for Industrial Democracy, informs Dr. King of the upcoming publication of a new work entitled, "American Power in the Twentieth Century" by Michael Harrington. Feldman also informs Dr. King of the predicted demand for the publication and urges him to place his order early.

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Jesus Christ (good will)

Dr. King references H. Richard Niebuhr's statement, "Christ is the Rosetta Stone of Christianity." He also talks about archaeological discoveries and translating languages.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

End the War in Vietnam

The bumper sticker reflects the sentiments of many Americans during the Vietnam War. It states "End the War in Vietnam: BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW!"

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

53rd Annual NAACP Convention

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

Serving as an itinerary for the 53rd Annual NAACP Convention, this document outlines the schedule, location, and speakers of the seven-day event.

Letter from Jay Richard Kennedy to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963

Jay Kennedy encloses a copy of a picture and a transcript from a television program that included Dr. King. He thanks Dr. King for an earlier letter and explains that their views are aligned. Kennedy also briefly discusses civil rights in America and the federal government.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Rodney H. Clurman to Jayaprakash Narayan

Monday, May 29, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman writes Jayaprakash Narayan about the current state of the Middle East. This letter was written just days before the Six-Day war between Egypt and Israel. It is suggested that the governments of each nation, including the U.S., be prepared for the possibility of increased violence.