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"Kentucky (KY)"

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

The Student Movement and You

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966
New York, NY

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

Monday, December 2, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berkeley, CA, Pennsylvania (PA)

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

God (His Love)

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne's "Studies in Christianity" on God's infinite love for humanity.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

Letter to Dora MacDonald from Joan Daves

Monday, December 12, 1966
New York, NY

Joan Daves writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's availability, while he's away in New York. She also requests that a copy of the transcript, from a conference, be given to Dr. King as well as herself.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Whitey the Honkey to MLK

Washington, D.C.

The author stresses that Dr. King is a part of the race problem. They offer numerous political suggestions and concludes that Dr. King should simply mind his own personal matters.

Fifth Grade Students Write to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL

Fifth Graders at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, write to Dr. King in request of literature about his style of worship.

Schleiermacher and Original Sin

This note card documents a passage from Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith" regarding original sin. Dr. King's note collection contains many cards that reference the theologian's work and ideas.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the final payment for an excerpt from Life Magazine, titled "Why We Can't Wait."

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

VIETNAM, Illinois (IL)

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961
North Carolina (NC), ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964
New York (NY), HUNGARY

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

To Set Our People Free

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Hawaii (HI), ETHIOPIA

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.