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Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966
ITALY, Louisville, KY

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962
New York, NY

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

John Duns Scotus


Dr. King records these notes about the life of John Duns Scotus, a noted Scottish philosopher and theologian of the High Middle Ages.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

New York, NY

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961
Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Kentucky (KY), West Virginia (WV), Oklahoma (OK), North Carolina (NC), Missouri (MO), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Memorandum to MLK about Black Power and the Marks of Slavery

New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

This memorandum to Dr. King addresses the significance of black power and the marks of slavery. It also references excerpts from "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
London, England, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Letter from Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
South Africa

A. Philip Randolph, the Chairman of the Committee of Conscience Against Apartheid, sent this letter to urge Chase Manhattan and First National City Banks users to withdraw their funds to signify their disapproval of their engagement in South Africa.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Southern Christian Leadership Rally Souvenir Program

Friday, October 18, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, Indiana (IN)

This is the 1963 Souvenir Program for the Southern Christian Leadership Rally, an initiative of the citizens civic planning committee. Dr. King is honored as an audacious leader.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Andrew Young Writes On Behalf of Michael Rosen

Monday, November 27, 1967
New York (NY), South Carolina (SC)

Andrew Young writes a letter of recommendation, on behalf of Michael Rosen, to the New York State Supreme Court.

Letter from Jerome Karlin to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Jerome B. Karlin expresses his admiration for Dr. King's dedication to the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Karlin highlights the importance of Dr. King's ideals and the continuation of the fight for social justice.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Postcard from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

The Mayor of Jerusalem sends Dr. King a panoramic postcard of the city.


Dr. King relates a quotation from General Douglas MacArthur to Jesus. According to General MacArthur, "Nobody can stop the irresistible influence of a sound idea." Dr. King argues that, though Jesus was killed, his ideas still live.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962
New York, NY

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Sermon Notes: Christianity Explored

Dr. King discusses the various concepts of the religious body of Christianity. He specifically highlights the Christian perspective in relation to life, the Kingdom of God on Earth, and Jesus Christ.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY, GERMANY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.