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"LEBANON"

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Schedule for Trip to Oslo, Norway

This document contains the schedule for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway. During this trip, Dr. King is scheduled to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and meet with King Olav V of Norway.

Letter from Lynn Ewell to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. about Comments on College Course

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter Lynn Ewell inquires as to whether Dr. King will offer any comments pertaining to the college course "Education of the Adolescent" and the class research topic of "Building an Enduring Peace."

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Memorandum from Dorothy Cotton to SCLC Staff

Dorothy Cotton provides the SCLC staff with instructions for and information about the Tenth Annual Convention, including suggested procedures, details about transportation and expenses, and staff work assignments.

Science

Dr. King writes about Lewis Mumford’s view in “The Condition of Man” that an increase in scientific knowledge requires an increase in moral discipline.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter to Margaret C. Fowler from MLK about Governor Nelson Rockefeller

Thursday, September 9, 1965

In this letter to New York Calendar Secretary Margaret Fowler, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Governor Rockefeller's willingness to speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Men's Day Observance. Dr. King then describes the schedule of events for Rockefeller's visit.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Saturday, May 28, 1955

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from Schuyler Coward to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Schuyler Coward encloses three cartoons that he drew to Dr. King. He expresses his wishes to serve Dr. King's organization and requests a swift response to his letter.

Royalties from "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, April 30, 1967

This document is a reference to the royalties earned from Dr.King's book "Why we Can't Wait", the Norwegian edition.

Helen Meun Addresses the Arlington Demonstration

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Meun writes to members of the SCLC and explains that those involved in the Arlington demonstration were unaware to its purpose. Furthermore, she suggests that the children who were harmed during this demonstration be given an explanation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Svend Eril Stybe

Friday, February 7, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark at the request of the Student Association. He graciously turns down the invitation stating that he has made the "firm decision" to spend more time in the American South in order to focus on civil rights work.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.