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"LEBANON"

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Letter from Barnes and Smith to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Account Executive M. J. Orman proposes that Dr. King use a reflective decal manufactured by his company as a fundraising item.

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

Monday, August 1, 1966

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Lenin

Dr. King labels a quote from Vladimir Lenin "a false dictum."

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter to the Montgomery Advertiser

Friday, January 11, 1957

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference expresses their appreciation to the Montgomery Advertiser.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Western Union Telegram from Harrison Tweed and Bernard G. Segal to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Mr. Tweed and Mr. Segal urge Dr. King to observe Judge Johnson's order prohibiting marches to Montgomery, Alabama. They also enclose an excerpt of their telegram to Governor George Wallace compelling him to restrain law enforcement from excessive force.

Letter from Nicholas Gage to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

In this letter dated May 8, 1967, Nicholas Gage writes to Dr. King. Mr. Gage, who works for the Boston Herald, thanks Dr. King for allowing him to interview him. He encloses a copy of the story of the interview that Dr. King gave him.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from the European Baptist Federation to Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 7, 1964

P.M. Smith, Dr. Ruden's secretary, writes to Miss McDonald to express gratitude for Dr. King's consideration in attending the European Baptist Federation Conference in Amsterdam.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Theory of Perception in the Light of the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead's "fallacy of misplaced concreteness" as described in "Science and the Modern World."

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Letter from Katherine H. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, March 27, 1965

Katherine H. Jackson writes Dr. King on behalf of the late Reverend James J. Reeb. The Marin County Board of Supervisors declared March 20, James J. Reeb Memorial Day. Contributions were received throughout the county and forwarded to the SCLC. In addition, Jackson invites Dr. King to Marin County at a later, more convenient date.

Letter from Arthur Newberg to Senator Roman Hruska

Thursday, March 3, 1966

Reverend Arthur H. Newberg writes this letter to Nebraska Senator Roman L. Hruska (R-NE) regarding an investigation of United States investments and corporation operations in South Africa. Due to international and national consequences, Newberg solicits help with pressuring the decision to subpoena key witnesses that are U.S. corporate and government officials. The author is concerned that the investigation may confirm "the existence of a pattern of American economic support for South African apartheid."

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee of the Kennett Consolidated School, contacts Ms. McDonald in an attempt to reschedule an event cancelled by Dr. King.