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"LIBERIA"

Request for Message form Amalgamate Laundry Workers Joint Board

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Louis Simon is writing to Dr. King requesting a message that he may include on the souvenir program for a concert the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board will be hosting.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

This letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to Dr. King request Dr. King send and autograph for the St. John's Military Academy autograph collection.

SCLC Report: Operation Breadbasket

Rev. Fred C. Bennette, Jr. writes a report on Operation Breadbasket. Rev. Bennette "hopes to increase its activity in alleviating the economic plight of the Negro in America." At the culmination of the report, he lists the main cities where the project will be implemented.

Letter from Robert Bartlett to MLK

The minister of the First Congregational Church sends encouraging words to Dr. King after his attack in Harlem, New York.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Nite of Civil Rights

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This program details events that occurred for a "Nite of Civil Rights."

Conception of Man

Dr. King documents a passage from Reinhold Niebuhr's work "The Nature and Destiny of Man." He would later cite this work in his essay "The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr," written during his career at Boston University.

Letter from James Huger to MLK Regarding Recent Visit

Monday, January 15, 1968

Mr. Huger, City Commissioner of Dayton Beach, Florida, informs Dr. King how much he enjoyed a recent visit to Ebenezer, and wishes Dr. King good health and success.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter to MLK from John Yeatman

Saturday, May 6, 1967

John Yeatman sends his gratitude for all of Dr. King's efforts in teaching peace and wishes him well in every endeavor.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Those Attending Breakfast with MLK

List of attendees for a breakfast meeting at Cornell University in Ithaca (NY) when Dr. King was on campus to deliver his sermon, "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Letter from Paul Shields to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Paul Shields, the News Director of CBS Television in Atlanta, writes to Dr. King to lodge a complaint against the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's press department. He states that press conferences convened by the SCLC rarely begin on time.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Religion and Intelligence

Dr. King posits a theory on a battle between "semi-intelligent religion" and "irreligious intelligence."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Time

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.