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"LIBERIA"

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Authoritarianism

Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI)

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Selma, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX), California (CA)

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Telegram from MLK and Coretta King to the McCall Family

Montgomery, AL

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. King give their condolences to the McCall family as a result of the death of Walter McCall.

Letter from Charles J. Benner to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Illinois (IL), Detroit, MI, Selma, AL, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King is adversely described in this letter and accused of being a communist by Charles Benner. He further slanders the Negro race and objects to the current national movements lead by Dr. King.

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Letter from Horace Sheffield to MLK

Saturday, September 23, 1961
Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

Mr. Sheffield sends Dr. King a press release that discusses a Trade Union Leadership Council telegram to Dr. J.H. Jackson in response to his remarks regarding Dr. King and the Freedom Movement.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Letter from Joseph A. Howell to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Howell requests that Dr. King support the efforts of the United Church of Christ to stop smoking in America.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

HAITI, Washington, D.C., SENEGAL

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Berkeley, CA, Atlanta, GA

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Original Sin

Dr. King writes a definition of original sin.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
Missouri (MO)

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. H. Horace Perera

Thursday, May 26, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald responds to a letter of recent date from Mr. L. H. Perera regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at an event. McDonald states the Dr. King is out of town and will respond once he arrives.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Term Paper Notes

EGYPT, ETHIOPIA

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Letter from West Virginia NAACP to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

William M. Grayson informs Dr. King that he is seeking information regarding his availability to attend a speaking engagement.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964
New York, NY

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."