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Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter From MLK to Ada Hill

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hill for her letter commending his letter from the Birmingham jail. He assures Mrs. Hill her encouraging words will help give him the courage to continue in the struggle to make brotherhood a reality.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Letter from MLK to Joseph White

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Dr. White's contribution to the SCLC and apologizes for the delay of response that was due to a high volume of other calls and letters.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.


Dr. King distinguishes between monophysitism and the Chalcedonian Creed, which recognizes two natures in Christ.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter of Support from John Ladd to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

In this letter, John Ladd expressed support to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Mr. Ladd referenced a desire that his enclosed monetary contribution be directed toward efforts to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."


Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.


Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.


Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Long Island Baptist Societies Memorial Resolution on MLK

In this memorial resolution, the Board of Trustees of the Long Island Baptist Societies expresses its deep sense of loss at the tragic death of Dr. King. The board acknowledges the debt that is owed to Dr. King and commits to continuing his work.


Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.


Dr. King cites a passage from American philosopher William Ernest Hocking's "Meaning of God in Human Experience," in which he discusses various forms of mysticism.

Voter Registration Campaige in Atlanta

This document provides a historical reference of voter registration campaigns held in Atlanta, Georgia. The information includes participating organizations as well as strategies and overall goals.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.


Dr. King quotes St. Thomas Aquinas on the concept of God.


Dr. King records a definition of "science", quoted from John F. X. Pyne's "The Mind."