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"LIBERIA"

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York, NY

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

The Blame in Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Atlantic City, NJ

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Selma, AL, Jackson, MS, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Boston, MA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY, Oregon (OR)

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Letter From MLK to Eugene Exman

Friday, March 9, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King, in this correspondence to Dr. Eugene Exman, expressed his joy in finding out that his book was selected, out of 500, to be presented to President John Kennedy. Dr. King, furthermore, apologized for a continued delay in finishing a manuscript of sermons for a second book. Dr. King's sermons would be converted into his second publication, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA, INDIA, New York (NY)

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS, Washington, D.C.

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, South Dakota (SD)

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL)

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

Geneva, Switzerland

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Letter from Rev. Grover Graham to MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962
Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC)

Rev. Graham writes Dr. King thanking him for a previous letter and sends his support for Dr. King's leadership in the nonviolent pursuit of civil rights

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."