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"LIBERIA"

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961
INDIA, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967
Selma, AL

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Letter from Ludwig Meyer to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

Ludwig Meyer, Chairman of the Frankford Friends Meeting's Forum Committee, invites Dr. King to speak at his organization. Meyer states that if the date of the event is not convenient, he would like Coretta Scott King to be present.

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
Kentucky (KY)

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ISRAEL, VIETNAM

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from C. M. Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mrs. Johnson requests Dr. King's help in reinstating Congressman Adam Clayton Powell.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Thursday, September 20, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

SCLC Financial Report

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA, South Carolina (SC), Chattanooga, TN, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Orangeburg, SC, Virginia (VA), Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, December 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter of Support from Mr. Watts to MLK

Louisville, KY

This letter from W. Douglass Watts, a student, extends his support and best wishes to Dr. King for his upcoming birthday.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin

Thursday, August 15, 1963
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald expresses appreciation for the poem of Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin of the Progressive National Baptist Convention in New York. She encloses fifty copies of one of Dr. King's letters as Mrs. Mdonana-Arbouin requested.

Get Well Letter from Olive Andrews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King received this kind get well letter from Mrs. Olive Andrews, noting that she and her family prayed for his healing. She, furthermore, expressed that something good might come out of his unfortunate situation.

Critical Postcard to MLK

Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

The author of this document questions whether Dr. King is worthy of the Nobel Peace Prize Honor.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

California (CA)

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
New York, NY

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Honolulu, HI, Hawaii (HI)

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Alabama (AL)

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960
Louisville, KY, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.