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"Lincoln, Abraham"

Routing Slip

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

This document is an Office of Economic Opportunity routing slip from Maurice Dawkins. The slip has Dr. Kings signature on the first line.

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from Hubert Williams to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

A member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the increased tension between Negros and New York police.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Letter from MLK to Lillian M. Robertson

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

Dr. King writes Lillian Robertson acknowledging receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at the annual meeting of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship in Atlantic City. The Reverend closes by stating it will be after the first of the year before he can make a definite commitment.

Letter from Bill Baxter to Harry Belafonte

Friday, April 12, 1968

Bill Baxter, a public school arts teacher, addressed this letter to entertainer Harry Belafonte, following the assassination of Dr. King. The content of the correspondence expressed great admiration towards the work of Dr. King and the talents of Mr. Belafonte. Mr. Belafonte was a trusted friend and adviser of Dr. King, during the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to J. E. L. Graham

Thursday, September 15, 1966

Dr. King informs Mr. Graham that he is unable to accept an invitation to speak in Ontario extended by the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations. He further explains that this decision is necessary in order to spend more time resolving racial injustice issues in our country.

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

Monday, November 6, 1961

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, October 21, 1958

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Letter from Grace Pruitt to Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Grace Pruitt writes to Ms. McDonald informing her that the American Friends Service Committee does not have a large enough stock of "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" to send her 200 copies.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Friday, April 10, 1964

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

Letter from John L. Gregory to MLK

Tuesday, November 19, 1963

John L. Gregory informs Dr. King about the check dedicated to the SCLC. The Vermont Church Council is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement and contributes to Dr. King's organization to be an asset to the improvement of the American society.