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"Lincoln, Abraham"

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

California (CA)

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Iowa (IA), San Francisco, CA, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Brooklyn, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Kentucky (KY), Florida (FL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Albany, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

Friday, March 22, 1963
Albany, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964
New York, NY

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Examination for MLK Class

This document contains examination questions for Dr. King's class. Dr. King taught a class at Morehouse College briefly in the early 1960s.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from Robert Hatch to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Robert Hatch, a staff associate with the National Education Association, asks Miss McDonald to inform Dr. King of an invitation to speak at the organization's banquet in New York City. Hatch mentions that he is not only a former Morehouse classmate of Dr. King's, but also lived in Montgomery, Alabama at the same time as Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to the SCLC

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ralph Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary of the SCLC, submits the semi-annual financial report for the period of July 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 to the SCLC Board of Directors. He also commends his financial staff members for their good work.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Detroit, MI

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from Stanley Levison to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966
New York, NY

Attorney Stanley Levinson writes Dr. King about the state of the SCLC's finances, and the potential of a financial crisis.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Missouri (MO)

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDIA, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Letter from the University of Newcastle to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED KINGDOM

E. M. Bettenson, the registrar of the University of Newcastle, sends Dr. King a follow up letter inquiring his availability to accept an honorary degree.

Theology

Dr. King asserts that religion and theology must coincide with one another because, "religion without theology is blind; theology without religion is empty."

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Friday, July 31, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Harper & Row, Publishers Invoice

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King for the shipment of ten copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Effie Wilderson to MLK

New Mexico (NM)

Mrs. Wilderson writes to Dr. King informing him that the white Christian Church is in support of non-violence and equality for the Negro people.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.