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"Lincoln, Abraham"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Israel M. Augustine

Wednesday, February 20, 1963
Louisiana (LA)

Dora McDonald forwards a letter from Jessie Owens to Attorney Israel M. Augustine concerning potential legal counsel. Owens sought help concerning money and furniture that were taken from him.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York (NY)

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), GHANA, HAITI, Chicago, IL, Lowndes County, AL, GERMANY, SPAIN, SOUTH AFRICA, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.


Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966
Wisconsin (WI), Atlanta, GA

Frank Emspak, Chairman of the National Coordinating Committee, writes Dr. King requesting SCLC's sponsorship for the anti-war convention. This letter helps track activities of national peace movement.


Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from David Diamond to MLK

Tuesday, May 31, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

David Diamond, author of the book "A Bucket of Whitewash" inquires about Dr. King providing commentary for his upcoming release. As a result, Diamond is set to share royalties from his book sales with the SCLC.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), California (CA)

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA, NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.

Morehouse College Centennial Program

Atlanta, GA

This program highlights week-long events for Morehouse College's first 100 year anniversary in 1967. One of the many notable attendees is Howard Thurman, who at that point was a close friend and mentor to Dr. King.

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Cleveland, OH

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
New York, Connecticut (CT), Chicago, IL

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Letter from William Gurland to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Brooklyn, NY

William Gurland, chairman of the speakers committee at Adelphi University, invites Dr. King to address the student body at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. Gurland understands that Dr. King is busy with other responsibilities, but hopes that Dr. King will consider his invitation.

Ethics (A Criticism of Philosophical Ethics)

Dr. King references Emil Brunner’s "The Divine Imperative: A Study in Christian Ethics."

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Tuesday, October 23, 1962
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.



Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's view in "The Irony of American History" that "the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from MLK to Charles V. Arthur

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
CANADA, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Mr. Arthur to thank the staff of Kitsilano Secondary School for their contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Letter from Georgia Miller to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Georgia Miller informs Reverend Abernathy and Reverend Young that she can no longer contribute funds to the SCLC due to their support of the New Politics group.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King's stance on the American economy and the current status of the Negro.