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"Lincoln, Abraham"

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Dr. King writes Mr. Shriver to offer assistance to farmers who have been treated unfairly.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Friday, July 31, 1964

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

MLK Letter re Harvey Cox Book

Dr. King drafts a response to a request for permission to be quoted in Rev. Cox's book, God's Revolution and Man's Responsibility.

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Gift from the Jersey City Chapter of the American Jewish Congress to MLK

The Jersey City Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress made a donation to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth Center in Jerusalem in Dr. King's name. They sent him this note, wishing him a very speedy recovery and good luck.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Executive Staff Meeting of the SCLC

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King informs the Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff of an executive staff meeting scheduled for June 22, 1967.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Hicks to MLK

Mary Hicks sends a monetary donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was sent after Mr. Hicks consulted with author Mrs. Boyle about where a donation could be used.