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"Lincoln, Abraham"

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Dr. King's Speech in Front of U.N. April 15, 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Thursday, May 3, 1962

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

Thursday, June 11, 1959

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Evil

Dr. King outlines Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus' insights on the question of evil.

Show Business Salute to Danny Stradella

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Joey Adams invites Dr. King to attend the AGVA Youth Fund dinner featuring Danny Stradella.

Telegram from Oeberg Ruden Abrahamsson to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The Baptist Union of Sweden congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. The group also invites Dr. King to Sweden.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Hamman

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mr. Hamman for his previous letter in support of Dr. King and his work .

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harold E. Fey

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Dora McDonald is requesting that Harold Fey re-new Dr. King's subscription to "The Christian Century" for one year.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Amsterdam Article

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Letter from Philip Foubert to Joan Daves

Saturday, November 28, 1964

This letter dated November 28, 1964, was sent to Joan Daves from Philip Foubert. Foubert, editor of ECHO at Seattle Prep, writes to Joan Daves requesting that Dr. King write a "short letter, suitable for publication in our yearbook and addressed to the students of Seattle Prep."

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Man

Dr. King writes about man's estimation of finiteness and freedom.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Where Do We Go From Here Book Mailing

The people listed here received an advance copy of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," which was published in 1967.