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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

New York (NY)

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from Phale D. Hale to MLK

Saturday, December 7, 1963
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Phale D. Hale, Pastor of Union Grove Baptist Church, sends $100.00 in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Pastor Hale praises Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and offers to organize a massive fund-raising event in Columbus, Ohio if Dr. King will attend.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Draft of MLK Response to the Establishment of a Bi-Racial Commission in Saint Augustine, Florida

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

This is a draft of a response for Dr. King to make regarding the establishment of a bi-racial commission in St. Augustine, Florida to address the issues of equality, human dignity and racial justice.

Letter from MLK to Walter Everett

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Walter Everett regarding the libel cases of Rev. Abernathy, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Lowery and Rev. Seay. He thanks Mr. Everett for his support and informs him that they are "winning the victory" with his help.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Letter from MLK to Hal Lenke

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Hal Lenke for investigating the situation in Huntsville, Alabama and reporting his findings to SCLC. He is currently considering Lenke's suggestions. Lenke later coordinated press relations for Resurrection City, the Poor People’s Campaign encampment in Washington, DC.

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963
Alabama (AL)

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968
New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Pennsylvania (PA)

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Letter from Patrick V. McNamara to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Pat McNamara, U.S. Senator from Michigan, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for his letter of recent date regarding efforts to strip the poll tax prohibition from the voting rights bill.