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"Little Rock, AR"

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr.

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends information to Dr. King's parents regarding their upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Notes for an Address to Memphis Strikers

Dr. King drafted these notes, which were used in an address given in Memphis, Tennessee in March of 1968. "Dives" is a Biblical character who refused to give aid to the poor and was condemned for it.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King references Karl Barth's "The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Statement on the Muhammed Ali World Heavyweight Title Controversy

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

An unknown author declares a boycott of all fight games until the Boxing Commission restores Muhammad Ali's World Heavyweight Title.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter requests the help of Dr. King in dealing with the Principal of W. J. Creel School, who is allegedly a racist and uses racial slurs against his students.

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Thursday, August 5, 1965

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

What is the OIC Institute?

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

Monday, August 1, 1966

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. discusses the allegations and trials of Thomas Carlton Wansley.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.