The Archive

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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from J. B. Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

J. B. Hamilton expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit to the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

Letter from Spencer Beach to MLK

Thursday, April 14, 1966

Spencer Beach expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King and SCLC's stance on challenging "administration policy" about the Vietnam War. Even though he agrees that the Vietnam War is unjust, Beach feels that Dr. King should narrow his concerns to civil rights marches and issues within the United States.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

Letter from Reverend J. F. McMillan to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Reverend J. F. McMillan communicates with Reverend Artic Harris to discuss the sponsoring of Mrs. King in a recital for the three Negro Churches in Toronto. They have requested Dr. King to be the principal speaker for their 140th anniversary services. Reverend McMillan informs Dr. King that he is "interested" in the non-violent movement.


Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination. Memphis, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter of Appreciation from Ben M. Herbster to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

In this letter Ben M. Herbster offers gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of the General Synod of the United Cuhrch of Christ for a message that Dr. King delivered at their meeting.

Letter from Arthur Newberg to Senator Roman Hruska

Thursday, March 3, 1966

Reverend Arthur H. Newberg writes this letter to Nebraska Senator Roman L. Hruska (R-NE) regarding an investigation of United States investments and corporation operations in South Africa. Due to international and national consequences, Newberg solicits help with pressuring the decision to subpoena key witnesses that are U.S. corporate and government officials. The author is concerned that the investigation may confirm "the existence of a pattern of American economic support for South African apartheid."

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Faith"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Faith," Dr. King writes out some thoughts on the subject.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

Letter from Sam Aluko to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Sam Aluko writes Dr. King requesting him to contribute to the National Relief Fund, which assists displaced people in Nigeria.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Neale J. Pearson to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

A Ph.D. candidate from the University of Florida writes Dr. King to tell him about the political and social progress made by the university's Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) chapter. The writer tells Dr. King that the Chapter has invited various political figures to speak at an upcoming lecture series. He extends the invitation to Dr. King and Dr. Charles Anderson, while simultaneously seeking Dr. King's help in contacting Dr. Anderson. The student informs Dr.

Letter from Kate Krautheimer to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Kate Krautheimer informs Dr. King of an invitation from the University of Pennsylvania requesting that he address the undergraduate student body.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.