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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from Nathan P. Feisinger to MLK - 3/21/1968

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Dr. King sent this letter to Professor Nathan P. Feinsinger to recommend Miss Barbara Jean Williams for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Braymer

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Braymer of Questar Corporation for her generous contribution of 25 shares of Standard Oil Company of New Jersey stock to the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

Monday, November 22, 1965

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

In this letter to Dr. King, Norman Thomas, a pacifist and political activist, writes to ensure that he attend a small civil rights conference in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

Friday, December 29, 1967

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

Thursday, June 2, 1966

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Letter from Robert Friedman to MLK Regarding "The Forensic Quarterly"

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Robert Friedman informs Dr. King that manpower needs and compulsory service systems will be the topics of national discussion in high schools of the nation. Friedman asks King to contribute an article stating his view on the problem area for publication in "The Forensic Quarterly".

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter from Addele Dunn to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Mrs. Dunn writes Dr. King describing her living conditions in the south side of Chicago. Dr. King is currently in Chicago advocating for the citizens of the city.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from MLK to Catherine Haney Brock

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Brock for her generous contribution to the SCLC. King expresses his sincere gratitude and discusses how his organization uses the money received from its donors.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.