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Letter from Congressman Donald M. Fraser to MLK

Minnesota Democratic Congressman Donald Fraser asks Dr. King to serve on the advisory board of the National Committee on Tithing in Investment (NCTI). Fraser reports recent successes in the area of open occupancy housing, such as a project in Boston that rehabilitates homes for low-income families, and a project in Denver that raises seed capital for "integrated cooperatives and other housing ventures."

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays encourages the institution's board of trustee members to participate in the Centennial Convocation platform party. President Mays also encloses a calendar of events for the College's 100th Anniversary week.

Our Pastor: A Characterization of Dr. Martin Luther King Sr.

This document portrays a picture of Dr. King Sr. with an excerpt written by Emily Dodson McCrary.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.

Letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Kennedy thanks Rev. Abernathy for the SCLC annual financial report and praises its contents. She also encloses a financial contribution and money for a copy of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

MLK's Final Exam for Social Philosophy

Monday, May 28, 1962

Dr. King's final exam for the Seminar in Social Philosophy class he taught at Morehouse College from 1961-1962.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Joshua and Judges

Dr. King cites Biblical scriptures from the books of Joshua, Judges, and 1 Samuel.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Existentialism Defined

Dr. King provides a descriptive definition of the word Existentialism, based in part on the works of Russian religious and philosophical leader Nikolai Berdyaev.

Letter from George W. Parker

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

George Parker explains his theory of mind control as a "mass electronic psychological weapon." He also details how this weapon is currently being employed.

Telegram from Gordon Carey to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Gordon Carey of CORE wishes Dr. King well during his imprisonment in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

Monday, November 25, 1963

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to the SCLC

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Ralph Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary of the SCLC, submits the semi-annual financial report for the period of July 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 to the SCLC Board of Directors. He also commends his financial staff members for their good work.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.